Dallas police chief: Shooter had larger plans

(CNN)The gunman who killed five police officers in Dallas was plotting larger attacks, Dallas Police Chief David Brown said Sunday.

"We're convinced that this suspect had other plans and thought that what he was doing was righteous and believed that he was going to target law enforcement -- make us pay for what he sees as law enforcement's efforts to punish people of color," Brown said in an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union."
Brown said police found bomb-making materials and a journal at the shooter's home that suggested he'd been practicing detonations and appeared ready to take aim at larger targets.
It was enough, Brown said, to have "devastating effects on our city."
He said the shooter, Micah Johnson, "obviously had some delusion. There was quite a bit of rambling in the journal that's hard to decipher."
Among Dallas investigators' current goals: Figure out what Johnson had meant by "RB," lettering that Brown said he'd written on the wall in blood before his death.
Police are "trying to figure out what those initials mean, but we haven't determined that yet," Brown said.

Blood on walls

"At the scene where he was killed, he wrote some lettering in blood on the walls, which leads us to believe he was wounded on the way up the stairwell, on the second floor of the El Centro building and where we detonated the device to end the standoff there was more lettering written in his own blood," he said.
The details made for significant new disclosures about the killings that have rocked the Dallas community and the nation. Brown also sought to deliver a message to protesters in states like Minnesota and Louisiana after people there were killed by police last week in what critics have called cases of excess force.
"We're sworn to protect you and your right to protest, and we'll give our lives for it," Brown said.
"And it's sort of like being in a relationship where you love that person, but that person can't express or show you love back," he said. "I don't know if you've been in a relationship like that before, Jake, but that's a tough relationship to be in, where we show our love -- because there's no greater love than to give your life for someone, and that's what we're continuing to be willing to do."
"And we just need to hear from the protesters back to us, 'We appreciate the work you do for us in our right to protest,'" Brown said. "That should be fairly easy."

Negotiating with the gunman

Brown said the gunman was only willing to negotiate with a black police officer during the standoff.
He was also singing while speaking with police officers, Brown said.
"We had negotiated with him for about two hours, and he just basically lied to us -- playing games, laughing at us, singing, asking how many (police officers) did he get and that he wanted to kill some more and that there were bombs there," Brown said, "so there was no progress on the negotiation."
"I began to feel that it was only at a split second he would charge us and take out many more before we could kill him," he said.
That, Brown said, is when his officers devised a plan to use a robot to detonate a bomb near the gunman.

The decision to use a bomb

Brown said he faced a difficult choice -- with no way to send officers after the gunman without further jeopardizing their lives.
"He was secreted behind a brick corner," he said, "and the only way to get a sniper shot to end his trying to kill us would be to expose officers to grave danger."
When his officers proposed using the robot, Brown said, "I approved it. And I'll do it again if presented with the same circumstances."
"You have to trust the people whose lives are at stake. I appreciate critics, but they're not on the ground, and their lives are not at risk," he said.
Brown also said police arrested 20 to 30 people who had been involved in protests in Dallas that night who were wearing gas masks and bullet-proof vests and had AR-15s slung across their shoulders. That's legal in Texas, he said, but once the shooting began, those people "were suspects."
He also encouraged Americans to "stand up" to support police officers.
"These officers risk their lives for $40,000 a year. $40,000 a year," he said. "And this is not sustainable, not to support these people.
"We're not perfect. There's cops that don't need to be cops. I have been the first to say, we need to separate employment with those types of cops -- 1% or 2%. The 98% or 99% of cops come to work, do this job, come to work for 40 grand. It's not sustainable."
Source: CNN
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Now hiring: Women with these degrees

icture a software engineer or video game developer. What do you see?

Chances are it's not a woman.

 

One reason is that women are still very much in the minority in computer sciences and engineering.

Even though there are many efforts underway to encourage girls from a young age to pursue STEM fields, the pipeline of women coming out of college with degrees in engineering and computer science is still very small relative to men.

That's also why talented women entering the workforce with degrees in those fields are not likely to have much trouble finding a job.

For many, "It's 'Which job will I take?'" said Karen Panetta, a tenured professor of engineering and associate dean of graduate education at Tufts University.

For starters, anyone with a computer science degree is in high demand, regardless of gender. And not just at high-tech firms either, but in many sectors that realize their future is in digital technology and computing, said Jeannette Wing, vice president of Microsoft Research who previously ran Carnegie Mellon's computer science department.

Companies are also clamoring for engineers. A firm called Shift, an online site that buys and sells used cars, will pay a $20,000 referral fee to anyone who recommends a good engineer who ends up being hired, said cofounder and COO Minnie Ingersoll.

The business case for hiring women

On top of the high demand, there is a pressure on employers to increase gender diversity in their workforce.

"All the top companies are absolutely committed to increasing diversity and inclusion. But we have a ways to go," Wing said.

Some, of course, may just be spurred by optics. "Companies know they need women because [otherwise] they will be shamed by the press and outspoken advocates," said Ingersoll, who previously led efforts to create Google Fiber.

The smart ones, however, also realize it can be a huge asset to their bottom line.

Take gaming. Women make up only 22% of game developers yet represent 50% of people who play video games, said Elizabeth Brown, the chief people officer of Unity Technologies, which provides products and services for game developers.

So it makes good business sense to want to hire more women developers because the people who create the games should represent an industry's customer base, Brown said.

Brown advises recruiters for Unity to provide hiring managers with an equal number of qualified male and female applicants. From there, the managers then must hire based on someone's skills, experience and cultural fit, since the goal is always to hire the best talent.

Beware the culture and pay gaps

Once hired, female engineering and computer science grads are likely to find themselves very much in the minority.

Hope Bovenzi, a system applications engineer at Texas Instruments, says she's the only female on her team of 20.

To be heard in that environment, Bovenzi said, she has to be more vocal -- and at times more "pushy" as she put it -- than she is by nature.

A long-term engineering career can be very lucrative, but a predominantly male culture has meant that companies have had a hard time retaining women long-term, said Panetta, who also works with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

It can be particularly problematic when they're working for male managers from other countries, where women are not seen as equals, she added.

"Some corporations now realize they can hire mountains of women fresh out of college but lose them three to five years out because of work culture," Panetta said.

And there's still a pay gap problem.

Panetta noted that some female engineering grads find out that a company may have offered them $5,000 to $7,000 less in starting salary than their fellow male students. But she advises them to go back and ask for more.

Or in cases where a company lowballs them relative to competitors' offers, women engineering grads who ask for more are likely to get it.

"Companies are ready to negotiate," Panetta said.

But women have to ask for what they want and know what their skills are worth.

"Be bold," Bovenzi advised.

Source: CNN.com

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14 Most Dangerous Cities in the World

here is an innate sense of adventure within all of us and it is that instinct that sends us to the internet in order to find a cheap flight somewhere beautiful, far away from home. We live for our vacations and special hotel reservations and we typically can’t wait to see the world. The majority of the planet is beautiful and there is nothing quite as magical as experiencing a foreign culture that appeals to you in an emotional and physical way. However, not all places should be visited by tourists for a variety of different reasons. As it turns out, there are many places in the world that appeal to tourists who don’t realize just how dangerous they are to visit. We decided to pick 14 different cities that should be known for how dangerous they are. Listed below are the 12 most dangerous cities to travel to in the world.

Barquisimeto – Venezuela

We are in South America now to look at the city of Barquisimeto which is located in Venezeulas. As far as cities to travel to in South America you might want to skip the cheap ticket and hotel reservation when it comes to this destination. Barquisimeto was founded in 1552 and for a long time the city grew in such a way that tourism was actually increasing. With over one million citizens and tons of architecture it makes sense for this to become a hot spot for visitors. As the fourth largest city in Venezuela, in terms of population, we were surprised to see that it actually has been in a tail spin in regards to the tourism industry. Daily murders and a high rate of other violent crimes have dimmed what could have been an inspiring tourist destination.

Rio de Janeiro – Brazil

Rio de Janeiro is a thriving city located in Brazil and the city was recently put on full display for the Olympic Games and the World Cup. Still, this is not a city you want to make a point of visiting — not unless you like living life with the threat of danger surrounding you. Rio de Janeiro struggles mightily with crime of all kinds with most of the focus being on drug related activities. The threat of being mugged, attacked, and murdered has actually been escalating since the big media events have taken place. Right now estimates are at 35 murders per 100,000 people which is a number high enough that you would never feel at ease while taking a trip here. Make a hard pass on this destination and opt for somewhere safer, and cleaner.

Sana’a – Yemen

Yemen is located in Western Asia and is located on the the south end of the Arabian Peninsula. Bordered by Saudi Arabia and Oman out to the East, the country has been struggling with political instability for far back as history will take you. The fact that Yemen is considered a developing country isn’t lost on us as the violence located in many of the biggest cities has been off the charts in recent years. Sana’a is a beautiful, old city that is filled with gorgeous architecture and vibrant culture. However there is an inherent danger in visiting the city, especially for tourists. If you do make it to Sana’a then you owe it to yourself to go to the Old City portion of the town to see the beautiful architecture.

Ciudad Juarez – Mexico

Known by locals as Juaritos, Ciudad Jaurez is one of the most violent and corrupt cities in all of Mexico. Located south of El Paso, Texas and right off of the Rio Grande the city of Juaritos houses over 1.3 million people within its borders. Established in the 1650s by Spanish explorers, Ciudad Juarez has grown into one of the largest cities in Mexico. Due to intense drug trafficking and a corrupt government there has been no clear way for Mexico to reclaim one of their largest cities. Ciudad Juarez has, at several points in time, been ranked among the top two or three most violent cities on the planet.

St. Louis – United States

We have to make mention of one of the most divisive cities in the United States of America so we decided to list St. Louis. St. Louis and its surrounding areas were heavily in the news for the Ferguson riots but even before that the city had been heavily suffering from violence and disparate poverty. Despite successful sports franchises and a nice midwestern seat, St. Louis is an easy enough destination to avoid traveling to.

Guatemala City – Guatemala

The nation of Guatemala may have plenty of tourist friendly destinations but Guatemala City is definitely not one of those places. This Central American city is plagued by murder and various drug related crimes. Car jackings, bus jackings, and street robberies are considered the norm here and tourists would be better served opting to go visit a different place in the region.

Acapulco – Mexico

If your first inclination to reading Acapulco on this list was a hearty ‘huh’ then you probably aren’t the only one. Acapulco used to be a trendy tourist spot for those seeking to steal some time in the sun and on the beautiful beaches. The deep blue water, tasty margaritas, and affordable food would be enough to bring anyone in for a weekend getaway. However, Acapulco has been getting more and more dangerous by the year with the violence peaking in requiring the Mexican military to show up and handle things. Tourism is on the downslide here.

Nairobi – Kenya

Much like many of the South American countries on this list, Africa also suffers from violent cities beset in a beautiful location. Nairobi makes our list as a sprawling city that has suffered almost permanently from war and violence. Al Shabaab has left their mark on the city and these violent militants make this an unattractive destination for just about anyone to come visit. Locals are told not to go out after dark and tourists should listen to that suggestion doubly so.

Maceio – Brazil

For such a beautiful continent, South America is really racking up a ton of space on this list. Maceio, located in Brazil, is the next city that all tourists should consider avoiding. Maceio averages 135 murders per 100,000 residents and you’re going to need more than a gorgeous ocean view to make me consider taking a trip there. Maceio is competitive with Rio de Janeiro for the most violent city in the country.

San Salvador – El Salvador

If visiting Honduras isn’t scary enough then you can consider taking a trip to the tiny country of El Salvador. San Salvador isn’t known for much beyond their production of one of the most fierce gangs on Earth: MS 13. MS 13, along with the drug trade and explosive poverty, have led to San Salvador completely going off of the rails. There are safe places to visit in El Salvador, but this definitely isn’t one of them. Avoid the allure of the beautiful climate and opt for somewhere else.

Cape Town – South Africa

While South African can be a beautiful place due to the diverse eco system, wonderful surfing, and brilliant beach towns there is more than enough trouble there than it is worth. Cape Town is one of the more popular tourist destinations in all of South Africa but recent violent numbers show that this might not stay that way. People blame the South African government for not doing anything to stop the burgeoning gang problems and questions of corrupt city officials have only exacerbated these claims. If you are going to South Africa and want to make your way to Cape Town then you should stick to the tourist areas.

San Pedro Sula – Honduras

Honduras is located in the a beautiful spit of land in Central America and it is bordered by Guatemala and Nicaragua while cushioned in by the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Honduras is a beautiful coastal country that is covered in a dense and vibrant array of natural formations, replete with diverse ecosystems. Yet, despite all of this beauty there is an innate sense of danger within the developing urban areas. San Pedro Sula in particular should be avoided by travelers at all cost. With a population of just over 1 million people, San Pedro Sula ranks in as one of the most dangerous cities on Earth. In fact it has been called the ‘Murder Capital of the World’ at many points in time. The reason for all of the violence can be laid at the feet of the various street gangs and drug traffickers that are fighting for turf control. In fact, things are so bad here that the city has been cited as one of the major reasons for Alien Minors trying to sneak into the United States.

Medellin – Colombia

Medellin used to be the most violent city on the face of the planet thanks in large part to the illicit work of Pablo Escobar — the former leader of the Medellin Cartel. Since the death of Escobar crime has been gradually falling though it is still not a city that tourists or visitors should take lightly. Right now the murder per capita rate is sitting at 20 deaths per 100,000 people and this is the lowest the rate has been in decades. Though the city is trending in the right direction there is still a ton of work to do.

Durban – South Africa

Though you probably have never heard of it, Durban is the largest city in all of KwaZulu-Natul and the second largest city in all of South Africa, behind only Johannesburg. With such a large population and violence encircling the city it only seemed to be inevitable that the city would come under fire as well. Right now the primary cause of crime in the city is the drug trade which flows through Sub-Saharan Africa and the trade has been growing dramatically over the past two decades. The murder rate in 2015 was sitting at 35 murders per 100,000 people.

Source: CNN

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As convention nears, Republicans seek identity in an era of Trump

CLEVELAND — No, this is not your father's Republican Party — or your brother's, or your sister's.

It is Donald Trump's shape-shifting Republican Party that gathers in Cleveland over the next two weeks, preparing for a contentious convention featuring a novice candidate, a new agenda and a nervous future.

"Win or lose, the Trump candidacy has inflamed the divisions within the Republican Party," said Ryan Williams, a Republican strategist who served as spokesman for 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney. "Even if Trump does not become the president, these rifts will remain."

While the convention itself begins July 18, preparations begin in earnest Monday with platform hearings that may spotlight party differences over trade, immigration, and other issues likely to linger during and after the era of Trump.

Later this week, a meeting of the convention rules committee gives Trump's opponents a chance, however faint, to somehow derail his candidacy.

Meanwhile, a Republican Party that has seen a fair amount of change during more than 150 years of existence begins to assess what it will look like in the fall election campaign against Democrat Hillary Clinton and in the years to come.

Trump has already changed the party, including on:

Trade

Trump's calls to block the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal with Pacific Rim nations — and his threat to withdraw from the existing North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico — defy decades of Republican support for free trade.

Trump and his supporters argue that trade deals have sucked manufacturing jobs out of the United States; Republican-leaning groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce say trade creates different kinds of jobs and leads to lower prices for consumers.

Immigration

Trump's proposals to step up deportations and build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border don't sit well with Republicans who want comprehensive immigration legislation to address immigrants who are already in the country illegally. Some GOP critics say Trump's rhetoric is alienating the ever-growing bloc of Hispanic voters.

Style

Trump worked his way through a crowded field of Republican primary opponents with a slashing style that targeted rivals like "low energy" Jeb Bush, "Little" Marco Rubio and "Lying" Ted Cruz. Opponents responded in kind, calling Trump a "chaos candidate," and "con man."

The continuing resistance to Trump can be seen in the number of prominent Republicans who aren't expected to attend this month's convention — including the last two Republican presidents (George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush) and the party's most recent nominees (John McCain and Romney) — and a "Never Trump" movement that, despite the long odds, still hopes to somehow deny him the nomination.

Trump's emergence has been quite a change for a party once know for its top-down organization, one that tended to go with "the next guy in line" when deciding presidential nominees — but not the first transformation of a party created in 1854.

During the 1884 convention in Chicago, a group of dissident Republicans loudly opposed the nomination of the allegedly corrupt James G. Blaine, and many went on to support Democrat Grover Cleveland, who would ultimately win the election. Those so-called "Mugwumps," whose members included future President Theodore Roosevelt, went on to form the core of a more progressive Republican Party.

In 1912, then-ex-President Roosevelt led a walkout of the Republican convention that re-nominated President William Howard Taft, a former TR ally. Roosevelt led a third-party bid, but he and Taft lost to Democrat Woodrow Wilson in a race that exposed a Republican split among conservatives and moderates that lasts to this day.

The Great Depression ended what had been a Republican era of domination of presidential elections. After his win in 1932, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal helped split the GOP into those who wanted to roll back government programs and those who wanted to make them more efficient.

President Dwight Eisenhower promoted the idea of "Modern Republicanism," but conservatives led by Barry Goldwater denounced Ike's programs as a "dime store New Deal."

Led by Goldwater, conservatives won control of the Republican Party at one of its most contentious conventions, the 1964 gathering in San Francisco.

Goldwater lost a landslide to President Lyndon Johnson in 1964. Republican stalwart Richard Nixon fused party factions behind his presidential election wins in 1968 and 1972, but fell in the wake of Watergate.

It took Ronald Reagan's successful candidacy in 1980 to consolidate conservative control of the GOP,  which remained more-or-less intact for the next three decades — until now.

Ronald Reagan stands before a cheering Republican National

Ronald Reagan stands before a cheering Republican National Convention in Detroit in 1980. (Photo: Rusty Kennedy, AP)

 

"Trump is a different kind of candidate than we've dealt with before," said Heather Cox Richardson, a history professor at Boston College who wrote a history of the Republican Party.

As Trump prepares to claim the presidential nomination, the Republican Party can be sliced and diced in any number of ways. There's the Tea Party, the business community, the libertarians, the religious conservatives, the remaining moderates and any number of other feuding factions.

Trump wants to use the convention to build party unity, though he has also said that is not essential. "I have to be honest, I think I'll win without the unity," Trump told backers recently in Raleigh, N.C.

Frank Donatelli, a former deputy chair for the Republican National Committee, said political conventions basically have two purposes: To unify the party and to introduce the ticket to millions of voters watching on television. This time, he said, "it's unclear whether they can meet those challenges."

Sarah Isgur Flores, a  Republican strategist who worked for presidential candidate Carly Fiorina, said the different factions had been debating well before Trump announced his candidacy in June of 2015.

"That conversation has been put on hold for a bit," she said. "I think that conversation will become louder in November."

USA TODAY.com

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Why cheaper gas may not be that great in the long run

With gasoline prices so low, it’s no surprise that U.S. motorists are driving a lot more this summer.

In all, more than 43 million Americans planned to travel by one means or another over the Independence Day weekend, the highest volume ever for the holiday, the motor club AAA estimates.

For those on the road, the national average price for a gallon of gasoline was $2.27, a price not seen on the holiday since 2005, according to AAA. By Friday, it had fallen by another couple of pennies.

Without a doubt, for most of us, fueling up for much less has been one of the big advantages of the oil price slump.

But what’s good for the driver isn’t necessarily a sign of energy stability for the U.S. and other countries in the years ahead, as the International Energy Agency reminds us.

In a new report, IEA warns that the rundown in oil prices is taking its toll on fuel-efficiency trends.

“Consumers have moved away from energy-efficient vehicles that they favored when oil prices were higher,” said the Paris-based agency, which monitors global energy markets.

In the U.S., sales of sport-utility vehicles are 2½ times higher than those of cars and other light-duty vehicles, IEA said. In China, SUVs are selling at four times the rate of smaller vehicles.

Fuel efficiency isn’t the only casualty of lower oil prices, of course.

Much has been reported about deep cuts in capital expenditures by oil companies in the U.S. and elsewhere, a figure that IEA puts at a combined $300 billion in 2015 and 2016 and calls an “unprecedented downturn” in spending by the industry.

“North America accounted for about half the drop,” the report says. “If prices remain at current levels, a significant rebound appears unlikely in 2017.”

As of Friday, the futures price for WTI, the U.S. benchmark for crude oil, was $45.41 per barrel, down $3.58 from a week earlier and $6.24 from a year before. Since June 2014, when WTI futures traded at $107.26 per barrel, the price has dropped by 58%.

While U.S. oil production has enjoyed a resurgence in the past few years, because of technologies that reached previously untapped shale reserves, that output has tapered off in response to low oil prices, and raising it again will be difficult at prevailing prices.

Perhaps even more significant is the advantage that the situation provides to oil producers in the Middle East. In that politically unstable region, oil supply has reached historically high levels, exceeding 31 million barrels a day, IEA data shows.

“The region now accounts for 35% of global oil supplies, the highest level since 1975,” IEA said. “The growth in production, from Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran, highlights the fact that low-cost producers in the Middle East remain central to oil markets.”

That’s something to keep in mind the next time we fill the tank so cheaply.

Source: USA TODAY

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Can your smartwatch give away your ATM password?

Could wearing a fitness tracker or smartwatch make it easier for scammers to exploit your private PIN? That’s the conclusion of a shocking new study released this month.

In the paper, “Friend or Foe?: Your Wearable Devices Reveal Your Personal Pin,” researchers from Binghamton University and the Stevens Institute of Technology describe how, with the help of a computer algorithm, they used data collected by these devices to crack passwords, which they managed to do with 80% accuracy on the first try and more than 90% accuracy after three tries.

Over 11 months, the researchers performed 5,000 key-entry tests on three key-based security systems, including an ATM, while 20 adults wore a variety of devices, such as activity trackers and smartwatches.

Typically, a hacker would need to install a video camera or fake keypad in order to uncover personal information, the researchers wrote.

However, they found wearable devices “can be exploited to discriminate mm-level distances and directions of the user’s fine-grained hand movements, which enable attackers to reproduce the trajectories of the user’s hand and further to recover the secret key entries.” Put in layman’s terms: The hackers could record information about your hand movements to reproduce the seemingly-secret entries.

The researchers added, “our system confirms the possibility of using embedded sensors in wearable devices, i.e., accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers, to derive the moving distance of the user’s hand between consecutive key entries regardless of the pose of the hand.” So, infecting your device with malware or intercepting the Bluetooth connection that syncs your watch to your phone wouldn’t be much of a stretch.

Keeping your information safe

Though it’s too soon to tell how this will impact everyday wearers — manufacturers have yet to respond to the study — it’s yet another reason to be vigilant about how and where you share your finances, especially online. Short of using your device-free hand to code in any passwords, it’s a good idea to follow best online safety practices, which include only shopping on encrypted sites, avoiding clicking on phony emails and doing your best to keep your passwords to yourself.

It’s also a good idea to keep an eye on your accounts for common signs of fraud. This can include unfamiliar addresses, sudden drops in your credit score and mysterious accounts opening up in your name.

Source: USA Today

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Chaka Khan and sister enter rehab over prescription drugs

NEW YORK (AP) — Chaka Khan and her sister have entered a drug rehabilitation program to battle their addictions to prescription drugs, and Khan says the death of her good friend Prince helped hasten her decision to get help.

In a statement released to The Associated Press Sunday, the 63-year-old Grammy-winning singer said she has been battling an addiction to the same medication that led to Prince's death. Prince was found dead at his Minnesota home April 21. An autopsy found he died of an overdose of fentanyl, a powerful opioid painkiller.

Unfortunately, I will miss concert appearances over the summer," she said. "However, it's vital that I put my health and well-being first. I know that I am disappointing some of my fans, but I also know they would want me to recover and be well and healthy."

Khan has entered an intensive rehabilitation and aftercare program with sister, Yvonne Stevens, also known as Taka Boom.

Khan said the pair "agreed we would take this journey together and support each other through the recovery."

"The tragic death of Prince has had us both rethinking and reevaluating our lives and priorities. We knew it was time to take action to save our lives. My sister and I would like to thank everyone for their support, love and prayers."

A statement posted on the singer's official site says all performances scheduled for July are postponed.

Khan covered Prince's song I Feel For You, which became one of her biggest hits. The two were longtime friends.

Source: USA Today

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Euro 2016: Portugal crowned champions after Cristiano Ronaldo goes off injured

Stade de France, Paris (CNN)Portugal gatecrashed France's Euro 2016 party to win the European Championship for the first time in its history -- and all this without leading star Cristiano Ronaldo.

The Real Madrid forward was forced out of the game with a knee injury in the first half, but Portugal regrouped and thanks to some heroic goalkeeping from Rui Patricio took the game into extra time before Eder struck with 11 minutes to go.
Portugal's 1-0 win was all the more remarkable given in their previous 10 meetings, France had won all of them.
"Simple as doves and as wise as serpents," is how Portugal coach Fernando Santos characterized his team's success at Euro 2016.
France hit the post late on in normal time, but so too did Portugal just before Eder's goal when Raphael Guerreiro's exquisite free kick came back off the crossbar.
The win was testament to a remarkable group ethic after Ronaldo was taken off on a stretcher following a robust tackle by Dimitri Payet on eight minutes.
 
Twice Ronaldo tried to hobble back on the pitch before he collapsed, distraught and in tears as he conceded his tournament had come to a premature end.
The huge ovation he was given by the Stade de France crowd -- French and Portuguese fans alike -- must have been scant consolation given the pivotal role he has played in this side for over a decade since making his international debut as an 18-year-old.
"Terrible to see Cris come off like that," tweeted Ronaldo's Real Madrid teammate Gareth Bale and no wonder given many had billed this as the crowning moment of Ronaldo's career as an international player.
 
Twelve years ago he was also left in tears after Euro 2004 host Portugal was surprisingly beaten 1-0 by Greece.
True France might have been favorites to win this final given its home advantage, but this was a real opportunity for Ronaldo to showcase his talents in an international final and add to the countless starring roles he has produced for Real Madrid.
In the end given the prodigious efforts of his teammates it didn't matter and Ronaldo, despite his injury, was well enough to jump up off the bench to join in the celebrations when Eder scored.
Portugal's fans certainly hadn't forgotten their talisman and as the clock ticked down they chanted his name again and again.
With Ronaldo out of the picture, Patricio was consistently on hand to thwart France, notably in saving a couple of fierce shots from Moussa Sissoko, who had an outstanding game.
Central defenders Pepe -- named man of the match -- and Jose Ponte were also key to Portugal's defensive obdurateness.
Pepe described Portugal's win as a victory of the "humble," while France coach Didier Deschamps paid tribute to the victors' organization.
"The winner always deserves it," said France coach Didier Deschamps. "You can analyze things but they didn't get to the final by chance.
"This is the first time I think that a team finished third in their group and ended up as champions."
Portugal coach Santos added: "I always said we were a team. I told them we have a lot of quality and talent. But first we have to run and fight."

Invasion of moths

Since Euro 2016 kicked off on June 10, the French authorities have had plenty on their hands given a state of emergency is still in place after France was targeted during the November terror attacks.
 
Sunday saw 3,400 police and gendarmes mobilized on the Champs-Elysees, with 1,400 deployed at the Stade de France and a further 1,900 keeping order at the 90,000 capacity Eiffel Tower fan zone.
Ahead of kick off the competition's organizers had yet another worry to contend with -- an invasion of moths, which visibly distracted referee Mark Clattenburg as he went about his final preparations before the start of the game.
Earlier Paris had been bathed in blistering sunshine and on a warm summer's evening thousands of French supporters -- young and old -- had made their way to the Stade de France in northern Paris in the hope that host France would deliver the nation's third European Championship triumph.

La Marseillaise

Some were daubed with blue, white and red face paint, others donned the French national team's replica shirts, many wore crazy wigs and hats, while Tricolor flags were waved with gusto.
They belted out the French national anthem -- La Marseillaise -- singing "To arms, citizens!" and "Form your battalions," in a bid to rouse their team ahead of the kickoff.
It seemed to work as France came out bristling with intent, notably when Payet clattered into Ronaldo, who was left writhing in agony. In fairness, Payet won the ball with his tackle, but in the follow through collided with the Portugal captain's left knee.
Amid the intensity there was skill as well from France, notably when Payet delicately chipped the ball to Griezmann, whose header was superbly tipped over the bar by Patricio.
Just past the quarter hour mark, Ronaldo needed more treatment on his left leg with the captain only returning to the action after the Portuguese medical team applied plenty of strapping to his left knee.
But on 23 minutes Ronaldo went down again and this time referee Clattenburg signaled for a stretcher, with the Portuguese captain distraught and in tears as he was ferried away.
Ricardo Quaresma replaced Ronaldo, but Portugal soon had others things to worry about when Sissoko created some space before blasting a shot that Patricio pushed away.
Soon after Cedric Soares was yellow carded for kneeing Payet in the back.
 
European governing body UEFA had predicted a global audience of 300 million people would be watching this final, but with Ronaldo off and Portugal concentrating on their defensive duties this showpiece at times was less show and more attrition.
Just before the hour, France coach Deschamps withdrew Payet, replacing him with Kingsley Coman in a bid to break the deadlock.
Payet had been key to France's progress to the final, but the French forward wasn't quite on his game and Deschamps didn't rule out tiredness playing a part in the rather subdued performance he gave.
It was Coman who teed up another chance for Griezmann, with the Atletico Madrid forward going agonizingly close with a header.
Amid the impasse, Sissoko continued to have a barnstorming game, notably tracking a dangerous run from Renato Sanches.
France was soon back on the attack but Patricio again came to his side's rescue, conjuring up a brilliant one-handed save to deny Oliver Giroud.
That was Giroud's final part in the proceedings as Deschamps introduced Gignac.
In contrast to Patricio, French goalkeeper Hugo Lloris had relatively little to do, but as the game edged towards extra time he had to tip away a dangerous cross from Nani and then deal with Quaresma's hooked shot.
Patricio was soon back in action and once more it was Sissoko providing the threat, launching a shot that the Portuguese goalkeeper flung himself to his right before pushing the ball away.
In stoppage time substitute André-Pierre Gignac came desperately close to snatching the win for France when he bedazzled Pepe, leaving the Portuguese defender on the floor, only to then hit his shot against the post.
During extra time, Portugal began to threaten Lloris' goal more often and the French goalkeeper was mightily relieved when Guerreiro's beautifully taken free kick hit the bar.
And then substitute Eder broke free and from just outside the French penalty area he struck a low shot that beat Lloris' despairing dive.
Portugal had to hold on for another 11 minutes, but it did so to deprive France of a third European Championship triumph.
Cue more tears from Ronaldo -- and who can blame him.
Source:USA Today

 
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Obama and Bush to speak Tuesday at Dallas memorial service for fallen police officers

Madrid, Spain (CNN)President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush on Tuesday will speak at an interfaith memorial service in Dallas for five police officers slain late last week.

The President will visit the Texas city at the request of Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said in a statement Sunday afternoon. On Sunday evening the White House announced that Bush would join his successor at the memorial service in Texas.
Vice President Joe Biden will also attend the service at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, as will former first lady Laura Bush.
Obama will also meet with families of the fallen officers. The president is cutting short a European trip to travel to Dallas, but he has spoken out on the shootings several times while abroad. While in Spain Sunday, the President condemned citizens who attack police officers, saying they are performing a "disservice to the cause" of criminal justice reform.
Obama made the remarks following a bilateral meeting with Spanish Interim Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.
"Whenever those of us who are concerned about fairness in the criminal justice system attack police officers, you are doing a disservice to the cause," Obama said at the Moncola Palace in Madrid.
Obama said that police and activists need to work together and "listen to each other" in order to mobilize real change in America.
The President added that in movements such as Black Lives Matter, there will always be people who make "stupid" or "over generalized" statements, but that a truthful and peaceful tone must be created on both sides for progress.
"I wish I was staying longer," Obama said earlier Sunday prior to a meeting with King Felipe VI. " I'm so grateful for the understanding not only of his majesty but the people of Spain. We've had a difficult week back in the United States so my trip is a little abbreviated."
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How to talk to kids about tragic events

(CNN)After horrific events like mass shootings or attacks by terrorists, parents are faced with this dilemma: What do I tell my kids? How can I talk to them about something so senseless and indiscriminate? About something that we can't make sense of ourselves?

"When we feel ourselves bombarded by images of brutal, ruthless violence and evidence of unbridled hate, the question of how to protect our children is a complex one," said Dr. Claudia Gold, a pediatrician, infant mental health specialist and author of "The Silenced Child: From Labels, Medications, and Quick-Fix Solutions to Listening, Growth and Lifelong Resilience." "We immediately jump to ask, 'What do I say?' "
Gold and other parenting experts stress that the age of children and their temperament really determines what -- and how much -- to share.

Limiting media exposure is key

If possible, children younger than 5 do not need to be told about what happened or exposed to any of the media coverage, said Tricia Ferrara, a licensed professional counselor, parenting strategist and author of "Parenting 2.0: Think in the Future, Act in the Now." "Keeping to routine is the best way to reassure children about the safety of their immediate world," she said.
Children ages 6 to 11 need just basic facts and minimal exposure to media coverage, she said, adding that there are definite lessons from what children saw in the media following the September 11, 2001, attacks. She points to studies that found that children who had repeated and prolonged exposure to media images had more difficulty with anxiety than kids with less exposure.
In a statement after the Paris attacks, the American Academy of Pediatrics urged parents to be careful with images that children see. "As pediatricians, we know that violence can have lasting effects on children even if they are only learning about it through the media," the statement said. The organization offered more resources for parents on how to talk to children about mass tragedies.
"A child will store the event in memory based on the narrative you assign the event," Ferrara said. "For this age range, stick to basic facts and turn off the TV."
Dr. Gail Saltz, associate professor of psychiatry at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, agrees, and said parents of young children should "stick to basic broad-stroke facts" and avoid any "nitty gritty details that are disturbing."
Parents should then communicate to their children an openness and willingness to talk, answering their questions and listening to their feelings, she said.
"Make it clear you understand their feelings. In other words, don't blow them off or avoid their feelings. This can be hard when they're (being) upset makes you more upset," said Saltz, author of "The Anatomy of a Secret Life." "But expressing their feelings will help them to cope. Then be reassuring about all of the security at work protecting us, and how rare an event this really is."

How to reassure your child

Reassurance is one of the most important things parents can provide children during a time of tragedy, when they fear it could happen to them, said Dr. Glenn Saxe, chairman of the department of child and adolescent psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center, in a previous interview.
"The first kind of thought and feeling is, 'Am I safe? Are people close to me safe? Will something happen? Will people I depend on protect me?' " said Saxe, who is also director of the NYU Child Study Center.
"You want to be assuring to your child, you want to communicate that you're ... doing everything you can do to keep them safe," Saxe said. "You also want to not give false assurances, too. And this is also depending on the age of the child. You have to be real about it as well."
It helps, too, for parents to acknowledge their own fears about how to keep children safe, even amid unpredictable violence, said Gold, who is also author of "Keeping Your Child in Mind: Overcoming Defiance, Tantrums and Other Everyday Behavior Problems by Seeing the World through Your Child's Eyes." It might seem counterintuitive, but acknowledging uncertainty can help parents connect with their children, and lead to a stronger sense of safety and security.
"It is frightening, but as the people of Paris who took to the streets expressed, we will not be afraid," Gold said. "When our children can sense that courage in us, they too will not be afraid. When we can manage our own anxieties, we are in a better position to listen to the responses of our children, which may differ according to their unique individual qualities."
Dr. Joe Taravella, supervisor of pediatric psychology at NYU Langone Medical Center's Rusk Rehabilitation, said parents should not be afraid to show their own emotions about tragic events. Children pick up on the "emotional temperature that's in the home," even if we think we're hiding how we truly feel, he said.
"We are our children's role models, so we should be leading by example at all times and when we're sad," said Taravella. "We talk about our sadness so we can talk about us being fearful and sad that this happened, but then, I always try and end on the positive to help them cope or deal with it, that we are a family and that we support each other as a family."
Parents should also be mindful of any changes in their children's behavior after learning about a tragedy, Taravella said.
"I would try and put their behaviors into words like saying, 'I see that you've been more cranky lately or more upset, I'm wondering if something's going on, if you feel upset about something,' " he said, which might help them communicate what they are feeling.

Helping teens open up

For teens, who will most likely have heard about the attacks through social media or news coverage, it is best to start by asking what they know, Ferrara said.
"Initially, it is possible they may not have much to say," she said, but they might revisit the topic when something connects to them personally.
"Events like this sometimes defy language, and a teen may struggle to discuss. However, remain open for these emerging adults. They need to know that they matter and that the world's complexity is in dire need of their taking the time to think about and understand what it means to be global citizens," she said.
"It is a shared responsibility that none of us, parent or young adult child, is able to avoid."
Source: CNN.com
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In active shooter situation, don't just stand there...

Johns Creek, Georgia (CNN)A crowd of about 350 listened quietly as the recording of a teacher's eerie 911 call from Columbine High School bellowed over the church auditorium's speakers.

"Heads down under the tables! ... Oh, God! Kids, just stay down!" a panicked Patty Nielson barked at students taking refuge in the school library, her directives intermittently interrupted by gunfire.
The screen on which the closed-captioned recording was projected later morphed to a dramatization of a Columbine-style attack, as two gun-wielding young men storm through a school throwing chairs aside and shooting students hiding under tables.
Johns Creek police Maj. John Clifton had warned the audience the images might be disturbing.
The group had gathered for a Civilian Response to Active Shooter Events training held at Perimeter Church in the Atlanta suburb, one of several such events increasingly being held around the country. Jackson, Mississippi; Durham, New Hampshire; Greenfield, Indiana; Pampa, Texas; and Orem, Utah, are among the dozens of cities that have staged training sessions of late, and more seem to be popping up every week.
Beverlee Athens, 45, and her husband, John, 59, drove from nearby Alpharetta to attend the Johns Creek event. Katie, 2, bounced on her mother's lap, oblivious that she was a primary reason her parents were at the church that night.
"I'm not going to sit back and be a victim," Beverlee Athens said.
John Athens, a retired firefighter and emergency medical services instructor who's in charge of security at his own church, said he and his wife have concealed-carry permits and "believe in protection," but the state of the world has him even more vigilant.
"I just know that we've got to be prepared. ... It's the day we live in now, unfortunately, and we've got her to think about," he said, nodding to his restless, smiling daughter.

'They do it for fame'

The idea behind CRASE is that the shooters at Columbine, at Virginia Tech, at Fort Hood, at Sandy Hook, in San Bernandino and in scores of other horrific events across the country since the late 1990s aren't like muggers. They don't want your wallet or purse.
They want a body count, blood and headlines.
"They're simply monsters. They do it for fame. They do it for notoriety," Clifton told the crowd.
 
Clifton went on to explain the directives of the CRASE training: avoid, deny, defend -- similar to the instructions given to employees January 26 when some kind of shooting event was reported at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. It later turned out to be a false alarm.
"Avoid" means more than run. It's about knowing where the exits are and visualizing how you'll get out of a violent situation before one unfolds. Don't live in fear, but be vigilant, Clifton explained.
"Deny" means taking away a shooter's chance to kill you, whether it's by barricading a door, turning out lights, silencing your phone or hiding, preferably behind something that will stop a bullet.
Then there's "defend," and that's where things get tricky, because essentially it means fight. And with a few exceptions, a mass shooter's targets aren't soldiers or others who might be trained to fight. They're regular people: students, coworkers, moviegoers and the like.
"Do not fight fairly. THIS IS ABOUT SURVIVAL," a handout given to Johns Creek attendees said.

Change in tactics

Pete Blair, executive director for Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training at Texas State University, which teaches police how to respond to active shooters, says Columbine sounded a "wake-up call."
Around 2002, realizing the model used by law enforcement officers who responded to the shootings at Columbine was not effective, schools began requesting "avoid, deny, defend" training. CRASE didn't become formalized until 2013, hence the uptick in training sessions across the nation, he said.
More than 85,000 law enforcement officers have been trained in ALERRT operations, and about 5,100 have been trained to be CRASE instructors.
Blair is a self-professed "data-driven guy," and there are a couple of statistics regarding active shootings that struck him: The first is that in one out of five incidents, it's the potential victims who stop the shooters; the second is that more than half of active shooter events are over before police arrive, which, on average, takes three minutes.
"That's a long time for someone to shoot at people," he said. "It takes some time for the SWAT team to get there, and during that time, the shooter has free rein to keep murdering people."
Joel Myrick is familiar with fighting an active shooter. A career educator, he was the assistant principal in 1997 at Pearl High School in a Jackson, Mississippi, suburb when a shooting occurred at the school. The event is considered the first in the almost 20-year rash of mass shootings that continues today.
On October 1 of that year, a 16-year-old who had just stabbed and bludgeoned his mother to death drove to the school and killed ex-girlfriend Christina Menefee and classmate Lydia Dew before shooting seven other students, all in the span of a few minutes. Myrick remembers hearing the shots.
"Being an old Mississippi boy, I'd deer hunted and I knew immediately he had a deer rifle, a .30-(caliber) deer rifle," he said.
Myrick rushed to his car to retrieve a .45-caliber handgun. When the gunman got into a vehicle, Myrick cut him off at the pass, leveled his weapon and ordered him to stop. The teen swerved off the road and spun out, and the assistant principal was able to "apprehend him at that particular point till police came," he said.

'Fog of war'

Now a polymer science instructor at Hancock County Career and Technical Center in Mississippi, Myrick says he can't say for certain he'd do the same thing if a gunman attacked the kids in his charge today.
"I feel like I would, but I can't say with certainty," he said. "My DNA, I would try to do the same thing. That's my opinion, but I don't have any way of knowing."
The reason is because in the "fog of war," as the former National Guardsman of 21 years puts it, no one really knows what they'll do.
The CRASE training expands on this notion. Humans are strange, social creatures, Maj. Clifton explained. How one person reacts can dictate how others respond. Humans are also prone to habit, he said.
When the first plane hit the World Trade Center on 9/11, some people took the time to log off their computers and fetch their purses or briefcases before evacuating.
When a fire engulfed The Station nightclub in Rhode Island, where the band Great White was performing in 2003, 100 people died -- 58 of them in the main entryway or just outside it, despite there being three other exits in the club.
"If something happens, most of you would exit the door you came in," Clifton said, pointing to the entrances in the back of the church auditorium.
Another human tendency hampering response in emergency situations is denial, he said.
"The brain doesn't want to think something bad is happening," he said.
That delay can put you in greater danger, especially when you consider that as your stress level spikes, along with your heartbeat, your ability to act rationally can be diminished. Once your heart rate hits 150 beats per minute, tunnel vision and audio exclusion can follow, further exacerbating matters.

Haunting example

Reaction is key to survival. At a Marietta, Georgia, CRASE training late last year, police officers shared a diagram showing the classrooms of Norris Hall, where most of the deaths occurred during the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting.
According to the graphic: The first classroom the shooter reached, Room 206, went into traditional lockdown. When it was all over, 10 of the 14 people inside that classroom were killed, while two were wounded. In Room 211, which also went into lockdown when the shots were heard, 12 of 18 were killed and six were wounded.
In the adjacent Rooms 204 and 207, students and faculty barricaded or tried to barricade the doors, while in Room 204, 10 students jumped out of the window. In Room 207, five of 13 were killed and six were wounded, while in 204, two of 19 were killed and three were wounded.
In Room 205, where a dozen students and faculty got on the ground and barricaded the door with their feet, preventing the shooter's entry, everyone survived.
"Doing nothing doesn't work. Doing something does, and these are the statistics to prove it," Sgt. Todd Hood, a SWAT commander, told the crowd in Johns Creek. "Hide and hope? That's like a wing and a prayer. ... That's very problematic. That's not what we teach."
While you're awaiting police, look for weapons and be prepared to improvise, he said. A fire extinguisher can be a fine weapon, and there's power in numbers if a group bumrushed a shooter.
"Pens can do damage," he said. "If you poke their eyes out, can they see? Probably not."
Myrick agrees with the approach, and concurs that planning is important.
"I don't think anybody knows that they will do when it comes to that particular point," he said. "If you're not trained to defend yourself, you won't defend yourself when the fog of war sets in."
The CRASE teachings, he pointed out, are more about planning than training. Why not take it a step further? Why not tack some balloons to the wall and let kids see how many they can pop with a math book? Why not let them have a go at swinging a chair, just for muscle-memory's sake?
Myrick worries that because there's usually no warning when a gunman kicks in a door, "you've got to have something right at your fingertips that you can do. There's no time to do anything."
He'd also like to see well-trained, armed security personnel in schools. The United States spent billions on nuclear submarines and never fired a shot, he said. It was a mere deterrent. Why wouldn't we take the same approach to schools, which house "our most prized possessions as parents"?

Chances low, but on rise

To be clear, your chances of being hurt or killed in a mass shooting remain slim. Statistics from 2000 to 2013 show that you have a slightly better chance of being struck by lightning than dying in a random mass shooting.
But the largely 50-and-over audience attending the CRASE training in Johns Creek is not being reactionary when they say the world feels like it's becoming more dangerous.
From 2000 to 2007, the United States saw an average of 7.4 active shooter events per year. The number is 16.4 for 2008 to 2013.
Robert Adair, 60, an architect from Peachtree Corners, just south of Johns Creek, said he wasn't much of a gun guy until someone he knew was shot and kidnapped. While he agrees with the "avoid, deny, defend" philosophy, his primary purpose for attending the CRASE training was to understand his responsibility as a gun owner in an active shooter situation.
"I have a carry permit, and basically I want to find out what I should do or should not do if I find myself at a scene before the police arrive," he said.
Hood addressed his query during the two-hour session: "Law enforcement officers seldom tell you to grab a gun, but do it here. If they're bringing violence to you, they don't matter."
But once police arrive, Hood said, holster the weapon, get your hands up and promptly let police know that you're armed.
Source: CNN.com
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U.S. gymnast Gabby Douglas’s spot on the Olympic roster may be in jeopardy

This was not supposed to be part of the story reigning Olympic champion Gabby Douglas had in mind when she set her sights on Rio.

A revelation in London four years ago, Douglas figured her bid for another shot at glory would be easy. Hard to blame her considering the way she so effortlessly reached the top of the podium in 2012, a soaring victory that made her a crossover star.

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“I came back and said, ‘Yes, this is going to be cake,'” Douglas said.

For a stretch last fall and this spring, it was. A silver medal in the all-around at the 2015 world championships showed her return was hardly just vanity run amok. Her professional effort while capturing events in New Jersey and Italy in March stirred inevitable comparisons to her sprint to Olympic gold.

Yet sometime over the last month, the momentum stalled. The Douglas that hopped off the beam in frustration during the first night of Olympic Trials on Friday hardly looked like she was having a good time. Her all-around total of 58.550 puts her seventh heading into Sunday’s finale, when the five-woman team expected to dominate the Summer Games will be announced.

Douglas described her effort as “just OK” when she knows much more is required. While the Olympic spot that once seemed automatic is still well within reach, the 20-year-old acknowledges the pressure has gotten to her. She figured she would have no trouble handling it when she returned to competition in March 2015.

“I think there’s more expectations now than there were before,” she said. “I’ve just got to go out there and just do it, not just shy away and test the water. I’ve got to dive in.”

That wasn’t a problem earlier in her career, when her fearlessness made her seem impervious to the stage. But after a so-so effort at national championships in St. Louis two weeks ago — when her fourth-place finish was well behind Simone BilesLaurie Hernandez and Aly Raisman — Douglas decided to tweak her coaching situation. She made Christian Gallardo her primary coach, a role Kittia Carpenter had been filling since Douglas began training at Buckeye Gymnastics in Columbus, Ohio, two years ago.

Douglas emphasized the decision was pragmatic, not personal. Gymnasts are allowed one coach on the event floor at the Olympics, and Gallardo — who had been splitting the duties with Carpenter — seemed a more natural fit to handle various responsibilities like spotting her during routines.

Many of Douglas’ peers on the national team, though, are still training with coaches they’ve been with since turning their first back handspring. Douglas has become a bit of a nomad over the last six years, moving from Virginia Beach to Iowa to California then back to Iowa before starting fresh in Columbus. The fact she’s prospered despite near constant change is a testament to her talent, which seems to thrive when the stakes are raised.

That’s what happened in 2012. It’s what happened last October, when she shook off lethargic training to finish a strong second to Biles at worlds. Douglas thought it would happen at nationals and trials too. And it hasn’t. At least not yet.

“I would be, ‘No, I’m fine. I can do this. When competition rolls around, I got it,'” she said. “The performances were OK. I was too relaxed. I got too far behind.”

Douglas believes she’s spent too much time focusing on “the wrong thing,” unable to completely block out the noise that seems to follow her wherever she goes. When she appeared too serious during national championships, social media lit up with criticism. In some ways, the detractors weren’t wrong.

“I lost the joy,” she said. “I forgot what it means to go out and have fun, and it’s catching up.”

Douglas presents a complex challenge for national team coordinator Martha Karolyi, who seems intent on giving Douglas every opportunity to get right. Two weeks after saying it’s how athletes are doing now — and not their gaudy resumes — that matters most in picking the team, Karolyi clarified her standards when pressed about Douglas’ lingering sluggishness.

“We look for the potential and you look for the fact of what you see what the girls were able to do in the past also,” Karolyi said.

Karolyi gave Douglas a brief pep talk as they walked off the floor Friday, one Douglas needed badly.

“I was kind of crushed after, and when she came over, she was like, ‘OK, everything’s good,'” Douglas said. “I’m just going to go on to Sunday and bang it out.”

Probably a good idea if she wants to erase any lingering doubt in Karolyi’s mind.

The sloppy ending to her otherwise steady performance Friday, when she wobbled near the end of her beam routine and was unable to save it before jumping to the floor in frustration, left her visibly shaken. The girl whose life has literally become a reality show — “Douglas Family Gold” just wrapped its first season on the Oxygen Network — is hoping for one more dash of the magic that once came so naturally.

“I don’t want to finish like this,” Douglas said. “I don’t want to finish with St. Louis being not good and trials being OK. I really want to finish on a high note and not let myself go down.”

Source:Yahoo.com

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Snoop Dogg, The Game Lead March to LAPD Headquarters

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Snoop Dogg and the Game led a peaceful march Friday to Los Angeles Police Department headquarters, where they urged improved relations between police and minority communities.

The rappers organized the demonstration hours after five police officers were shot to death in Dallas. In a posting on his Instagram account announcing the march, the Game said women and children should stay home and men of color should march to make law enforcement “aware that from today forward, we will be UNIFIED as minorities & we will no longer allow them to hunt us or be hunted by us !!!”

“Let’s erase the fear of one another on both sides & start something new here in the city of Los Angeles,” the posting said.

Snoop and the Game arrived at headquarters with about 100 marchers as a new class of 37 police recruits were graduating. Snoop shook hands with police officials and told reporters he hoped his presence would help reintroduce the black community to the department and open a dialogue.

“We wish them luck,” he said of the new graduates, “and we wish that they have a better understanding with the people so that they can do their job, peacefully, and make it home safely, just like we want to make it home safely.”

At the graduation ceremony, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck exhorted the new officers to not let what happened in Dallas interfere with their mandate to uphold the law fairly for all.

“This is not about black lives. This is not about brown lives. This is not about blue lives. This is about America,” said an emotional Beck, speaking slowly and deliberately, his badge covered with a strip of black mourning tape. “This is about a country based on a promise that does not recognize a difference in the shades of humanity. You are the symbol of that promise.”

He told the graduates that after they report for their first day of work on Sunday they will encounter people experiencing the worst days of their lives.

“Given their circumstances you might act in a similar fashion,” he said. “Have empathy. Look into people’s hearts. … Help them.”

Beck asked God to bless the city of Dallas. He also said more than 200 Los Angeles police officers have died in the line of duty, including 60 since he joined the force 40 years ago.

Source:Yahoo.com

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South Sudan: U.S. evacuates embassy staff amid 'sudden and serious' fighting

(CNN)The United States is evacuating non-emergency staff from its embassy in South Sudan, after an escalation of fighting in the capital that has killed scores including a Chinese U.N. peacekeeper.

The State Department said the security situation in Juba Sunday had seen a "sudden and serious deterioration," with clashes between government and opposition forces breaking out into "general fighting."
The United Nations Security Council, which held a closed door meeting in New York Sunday, expressed "shock and outrage" at attacks on civilians and U.N. compounds, saying they may constitute war crimes.
It called on President Salva Kiir and his rival Vice President Riek Machar to control their respective forces, prevent the spread of violence and genuinely commit themselves to the implementation of a ceasefire and peace agreement.
Fighting first broke out Thursday, with skirmishes between troops loyal to Kiir and soldiers who support his deputy Machar.
Fighting flared again Sunday, with gunfire exchanged outside a U.N. building, after a lull Saturday when the young country celebrated the fifth anniversary of its independence from Sudan.
"What we may be seeing is a total breakdown of command and control in Juba," said Kate Almquist Knopf, director of the Africa Center for Strategic Studies. "We need to watch carefully for whether a cycle of reprisal killings by either side begins in the next few days."
Japan's ambassador to the U.N., Koro Bessho confirmed the death of the Chinese soldier. Chinese and Rwandan peacekeepers also sustained injuries.

Death toll unclear

Earlier, South Sudan's information minister said the government is "in full control" of the capital, Juba, despite the United Nations reporting that the weekend's deadly violence had carried into Sunday.
Church services were interrupted by fighting between troops loyal to the president and those backing the vice president, but the violence has since subsided, Information Minister Micheal Makuei Lueth told South Sudan Broadcasting Corporation.
Lueth said President Kiir would issue a permanent and unilateral ceasefire before Sunday's end and urged his rival, Vice President Machar, to do the same "because we want to save the lives of the people of South Sudan."
How many have been killed in fighting between factions loyal to Kiir and Machar is unclear. Though one estimate puts the death toll close to 150, other reports indicate more than 270 have been killed. CNN is working to confirm an exact death toll.

Gunfire

Gunfire from "heavy weaponry" was exchanged for much of Sunday outside a U.N. building on the outskirts of Juba, the U.N. mission to the country said.
The mission sent out a series of tweets at about 8:25 a.m. (1:25 a.m. ET) describing "gunshots" and a "heavily armed exchange" outside a U.N. compound.
The U.S. Embassy issued an alert saying that fighting between government and opposition forces was ongoing at the U.N. mission's headquarters, the Jebel area of the city and near the airport.
The U.N. mission in South Sudan, known as UNMISS, said that 1,000 internally displaced people had fled its protection as violence hit areas near their camps.
"Both UNMISS compounds in Juba have sustained impacts from small arms and heavy weapons fire."
The United Nations urges all parties to respect the sanctity of the United Nations and condemns any deliberate targeting of United Nations premises and its personnel," it said in a statement.

Helicopters, gunships, tanks

The weekend violence erupted when Kiir and Machar were meeting to discuss previous clashes between their forces. Outside the presidential compound where the meeting took place, a gunbattle kicked off.
Pockets of violence broke out Thursday evening, and by Friday, soldiers loyal to Kiir exchanged heavy gunfire with others backing Machar, in a bloody skirmish that left almost 150 people dead by Saturday, according to Machar's spokesman, James Gatdet Dak.
CNN has been unable to independently verify the exact death toll.
The Indian Embassy in South Sudan advised its citizens "not to panic" and to stay indoors. Many of the UNMISS staff members are Indian nationals.
A U.N. base was attacked last week.
"We heard heavy artillery fire at the U.N. (base), and that continued for about an hour or so and then stopped. It was coming form the outer perimeters of the compound," said Shantal Persaud, acting spokeswoman for the U.N. mission.
Helicopter gunships were seen in the sky, and tanks rumbled through the streets. Under the peace deal, both government and opposition troops were stationed in Juba, a plan which many criticized because it put both forces in close proximity.

Flights canceled

Kenya Airways, which operates two flights a day to Juba, said it was suspending all flights to the city because of an "uncertain security situation," while Britain's Foreign Office advised against all travel to South Sudan, saying "the security situation in Juba has deteriorated" since Friday.
Two weeks ago, fighting in the western city of Wau between government and opposition troops displaced at least 70,000, according to the United Nations.
The country is nearly out of money because its funds come almost exclusively from oil revenue -- the value of which has plummeted. People have become desperate. In lieu of payment, government soldiers have reportedly been allowed to rape women, a U.N. report said.
South Sudan gained independence in 2011 after 98% of the population voted to break away from Sudan. The East African nation, the youngest country in the world, quickly fell into civil war that took on ethnic undertones.
In December 2013, soldiers from Kiir's Dinka ethnic group tried to disarm Nuer soldiers perceived to be loyal to Machar. Soldiers targeted Nuer civilians in the ensuing fighting, Human Rights Watch says.
The civil war was gruesome -- at least 50,000 were killed, more than 2 million displaced, and nearly 5 million people faced severe food shortages. Under a peace deal signed in August, Kiir is the president of the country and Machar is the first vice president, but the fighting hasn't stopped.
Source:CNN
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How one 26-year-old turned $500 into $2 million online

CNN)What started with a compliment turned one young woman's idea into a million dollar business.

When Kelechi Anyadiegwu started her online African clothing store Zuvaa with $500 two years ago, her idea was to share African-inspired designs with consumers around the world. Zuvaa is estimated to make $2 million in sales in 2016.
After receiving a compliment on her outfit, the tech savvy 24-year-old bought a domain name and started social media accounts.
"I didn't really know what I was getting into, I just had a vision and I was excited about where that would take me," New York-based Anyadiegwu told CNN in an interview.
"As a women of Nigerian descent, I grew up with African prints and fabrics. I loved wearing African inspired designs, and whenever I did wear these pieces, people wanted to know how they could also shop African inspired prints."
Instead of just referring these curious customers on to the designers she knew, Anyadiegwu saw a business opportunity.
"I decided to use my skills in social media marketing and online community building, to create a platform that would provide more exposure for the talented African-inspired fashion designers I knew existed around the world," she said.
Her success has already landed her on the Forbes 30 under 30 list.

Passion x expertise = a winning formula

While the path of a tech entrepreneur is not an easy one, Anyadiegwu's education set her up for success.
After studying User Experience Design in the U.S., she combined her passion for representing Africa on the world stage, her keen eye for design and tech expertise.
"I've always been a techie. I'm very interested in how technology and design could be used to change lives.
"Zuvaa brought together everything I was ever interested in. My love for Africa, my interest in fashion and my skills in technology."
 

The life of a young entrepreneur

Anyadiegwu has been very vocal about the fact that she did not want a traditional 9 to 5 job.
And she's not alone, according to research by Bentley University, 77% of millennials say flexible work hours make them more productive.
"My days are a lot longer than 9-5!" says Anyadiegwu. "From when I wake up to when I go to sleep, I'm working on Zuvaa. If I'm not directly working on Zuvaa, I'm definitely thinking about it."
Anyadiegwu predicts Zuvaa is on track to make $2 million in gross sales this year, she said having a clear vision is key.
"My biggest piece of advice is to trust your vision. Your vision for your life and company are really going to be what makes you stand out.
"No one is going to be able to see this vision, that's what makes it so special, that what will set you apart from others, that's what will make get every morning exciting to work and build your company."
he name 'Zuvaa' comes from 'Zuva' which means sun or sunshine in the language of the Shona people from Zimbabwe. Anyadiegwu's vision for the company is clear;
"We are building a movement of artisans, consumers and people around the world who want to know the stories behind their garments. Where they come from and who made them."
"People are excited that their traditional prints are going global and it's driven by people from their communities. Many are fascinated with the market that exists outside of Africa and how the global interest is trickling down to their local communities," added the young entrepreneur.
CNN.com
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Tim Duncan retires after 19 seasons, five NBA titles

After five NBA titles, two NBA MVP awards, 15 All-­Star appearances and a spot on many lists as the greatest power forward of all time, San Antonio Spurs star Tim Duncan is calling it a career.

Duncan, who turned 40 in April, announced Monday that he is retiring from the NBA after 19 seasons, all with San Antonio.

His final game ended up being a 113-99 loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder in Game 6 of the Western Conference semifinals on May 12. Quiet for much of the series, Duncan showed flashes of his All-Star form in what turned out to be his career finale, with 19 points, five rebounds and a block in 34 minutes.

"Man, he's meant a lot, a great amount," Spurs small forward Kyle Anderson said. "When you have Timmy on the floor and you're out there, it's so easy to give all your effort because you know he's just out there talking, he's out there making sure everybody's playing hard.

"He's like, I don't want to say a father figure out there, but he's like a big brother out there. I love Timmy. He's been a great teammate."

Since drafting Duncan, the Spurs posted a 1,072-438 regular-season record. That is the best 19-year stretch in NBA history and tops in the four major U.S. sports over the past 19 years.

Duncan partnered with Gregg Popovich to post the most wins by a player and coach in NBA history with 1,001.

Popovich will discuss Duncan's decision to retire at a news conference Tuesday.

The retirement brings an end to the Duncan-Tony Parker-Manu Ginobili Big Three that ranked as one of the most prolific trios in NBA history.

No group won more regular-season or playoff games than those three. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, they were the first set of three or more teammates to win four titles together since Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Michael Cooper and Kurt Rambis.

A four-year star at Wake Forest, Duncan was the No. 1 overall pick by the Spurs in the 1997 draft and made an immediate impact, winning the NBA Rookie of the Year award and earning All-NBA First-Team honors, the first of 10 selections in his career. He led the Spurs to a championship in his second season, in 1999, and was named Finals MVP.

He would go on to win four more titles, in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2014, and was named Finals MVP twice more, in 2003 and 2005. San Antonio posted a win percentage of at least .600 in 19 straight seasons with Duncan, the longest such run in NBA history.

Duncan finishes his career with averages of 19.0 points, 10.8 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 2.2 blocks per game. He ranks 14th all time in points (26,496), sixth in rebounds (15,091) and fifth in blocks (3,020).

Duncan made the NBA All‐Defensive First Team eight times. He is only the third player in NBA history to win 1,000 career regular-season games. Abdul-Jabbar and Robert Parish are the only players with more career victories.

Source:ESPN.com

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Consistent Greatness

Tim Duncan is hugging a ball, his eyes peering above his elbow as his world shrinks to a 94-foot by 50-foot floor. Or he’s congratulating a teammate, palming Tony Parker’s head after yet another assist.

These are the vivid images of a legendary career. Moments locked in the minds of adults who have never known an NBA without him. Generations of San Antonians who celebrated every bank shot and box out.

Nineteen seasons. Five rings. One team.

Duncan has led the Spurs to the best winning percentage in sports over the past two decades. On Monday, he announced his retirement.

When a 6-foot-11 island kid from Christiansted, St. Croix joined the Spurs as the No. 1 overall pick in the 1997 NBA Draft, a franchise, a city and a sport were forever changed. The moments were so consistent, so automatic, that they ran together over the course of 1,392 games, 1,001 of them wins.

He possessed the fundamentals and vision that went into 26,496 career points (14th most in NBA history), 15,091 career rebounds (6th all-time) and 3,020 career blocks (5th). Duncan and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar are the only players who have achieved such statistics.

2007/ Photo by Ronald Martinez, Getty

Behind Duncan, the Spurs have reached the playoffs in every one of his 19 seasons and won 50 or more games in the past 17 seasons, the longest streak in NBA history.

He has had 140 Spurs teammates and one head coach in his career. After every game, Duncan was the last one through the tunnel, waiting for his team to come off the floor.

“This is Timmy’s team and it’s always been Timmy’s team,” Tony Parker said in 2007, before the Spurs’ fourth NBA title.

Parker has assisted on 1,533 of Duncan’s 10,285 career baskets, more than any other player. Parker, Duncan and Manu Ginobili formed a trio that has delighted those in Silver & Black and defeated the rest. Duncan’s stoic leadership, Parker’s French flair and Ginobili’s energetic thrills combined for 575 regular season wins and 126 playoff wins together, both NBA records for a trio.

“I think I’ve explained to people that it’s like an evolution,” Duncan said in 2014. “We all changed along the way, and we went through different periods, but no matter who was at their best or who was leading us, we found a way to still win and do it together.”

Duncan is a two-time NBA MVP, 15-time All-Star, 15-time All-NBA selection and 15-time All-Defensive team selection. He holds Spurs records for points, blocks and rebounds.

Yet with all those accolades, most of the adjectives associated to Duncan speak to his relationships and his character instead.

Duncan’s quiet demeanor and humble nature may have had something to do with that. For someone who would carry his team whenever called upon, Duncan spent much of his career heaping praise upon teammates. The 2014-15 Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year award winner, Duncan may have patted teammates’ heads more than any player in history.

He beamed when veterans David Robinson, Kevin Willis and Michael Finley held the Larry O’Brien trophy for the first time. He was filled with pride to share an All-Star locker room with Parker and Ginobili, and to see Parker and Kawhi Leonard accept their NBA Finals MVP awards.

“Bonds are created not through just the good times, but the times we’ve lost or the times we’ve struggled or the times that everything hasn’t gone our way,” Duncan said in 2005. “It’s more about the journey than just an end.”


Nineteen seasons. Five rings. One team.


Coach Gregg Popovich and Duncan began building trust shortly after Duncan was drafted, as Pop went to St. Croix to meet with his newest player for a few days. They swam and spoke about life rather than basketball.

"I really cherish that time," Popovich said to Sports Illustrated in 2012. "It was like an instant respect and understanding of each other. Almost like we were soul mates."

2007/ Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein, NBA

They have referred to their relationship as kind of a marriage, and Duncan’s openness to coaching set a standard for the rest of the team. Superstar treatment in San Antonio meant listening to Pop.

Popovich and Duncan have been together for all 1,001 of Duncan’s regular season wins. No other player-coach duo has won more than 775 games together.

“It’s great to have confidence in who’s leading your organization and your team and knowing that they have your best interests at hand,” Duncan said in 2014.“That’s what made me stay and that’s what kept me here all these years.”

Duncan is a man of routine, the most iconic of which is his pre-game basketball hug.

Only he might know the rhythm and reason to the way he hangs off the rim at player introductions or tosses his warmup jacket in a particular way. But he is remarkably consistent in routine and consistent in results.

His fundamentals are so admired that on YouTube, where dunks and highlights reign, a mixtape of Duncan’s bank shots has almost 500,000 views. But the mark of Duncan’s longevity has been through the way he changed his game throughout his career.

He continued adding pieces to his repertoire, whether it was footwork or outlet passes. He changed his offseason regimen to prolong his career. The result was a fifth NBA title in 2013-14, his 17th season, and a triumph after an NBA Finals loss the year before.

Duncan evolved with the game, and his impact never wavered. He averaged at least 10.5 rebounds per 36 minutes in all 19 seasons, and at least 17.1 points per 36 minutes in the first 18 seasons.

In 2014-15, at the age of 38, Duncan averaged 13.9 points and 9.1 rebounds to become the oldest player named to the All-NBA Team in 29 years.


"It was like an instant respect and understanding of each other. Almost like we were soul mates." – Gregg Popovich


As Duncan turned 40 in 2015-16, the Spurs allowed 93.8 points per 100 possessions while he was on the court, the lowest of any player in the league. Duncan helped the Spurs to a franchise-record 67-15 season.

It was the conclusion of a career in Silver & Black that began on Oct. 31, 1997. He had 15 points and 10 rebounds in Denver that night, his first of 840 career double-doubles. Duncan also had 164 playoff double-doubles, an NBA record.

The journey began with a Rookie of the Year award in 1997-98 and a championship in his second season. The Spurs limped along early in 1999, when a 6-8 start during the lockout-shortened season held them in the middle of the pack. And then Duncan took the reins. He led the Spurs to wins in 31 of their next 36 regular season games to finish the season, then a 15-2 record in the playoffs.

1999 / Photo by Nathaniel S. Butler, NBA

“I think it’s going to be a lot more fun to look back and see what I did,” Duncan said after holding the Larry O’Brien trophy for the first time, “but right now I can’t do it justice. When I look back, it’s going to be something I won’t even believe.”

That was 17 years ago.

Duncan emerged as a dominant force in the league, winning back-to-back MVP awards in 2002 and 2003.

Surviving epic matchups against Kobe, Shaq and the Lakers, Duncan took the Spurs back to the Finals in 2003, as they faced the New Jersey Nets. In one of the greatest performances on a championship-clinching night, Duncan had 21 points, 20 rebounds, 10 assists and 8 blocks in Game 6. He also gave Robinson the fairy tale exit in his final season.

The Spurs won their third title in 2005, knocking off the defending champion Detroit Pistons in seven games. Duncan erupted for 17 of his 25 points in the second half of Game 7.

Duncan is joined by Jordan, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal and LeBron James as the only players to win the Finals MVP three times.

“This trophy is definitely an honor, but team has so many MVPs,” were the first words Duncan said when he accepted the 2005 Finals MVP award. “These guys just laid it on the line every night, so every one of them is the MVP.”

His sentiment rang true for the next two titles, when Duncan celebrated Parker and Leonard’s Finals MVP awards in 2007 and 2014.

The NBA’s all-time leader in playoff minutes (9,370), Duncan’s scoring average increased in the playoffs over the regular season in 10 of the past 12 seasons. Battles with Kobe, Shaq and the Lakers, Dirk Nowitzki’s Mavericks, Steve Nash’s Suns and LeBron James’ Cavs and Heat cemented Duncan’s legacy through a series of post moves, mid-range jumpers and one overtime 3-pointer with 3.0 seconds left against Phoenix.

“The consistency you’ve shown over the years goes unmatched, and as a competitor it’s always a treat to be competing on the same floor as you!” LeBron James posted on his Instagram feed in January. “Being a professional is so overlooked in our sport, but I always knew who I could look to if I ever wasn’t professional about this lovely game and that’s you. From one King to another and to the greatest power forward to ever play this game, all love and respect Timmy D!”

Duncan has played in 251 career playoff games, more than three full regular seasons worth of fierce rivalries and incredible memories.

2012 / Photo by Glenn James, NBA

His knees grew weary, but Duncan endured to win a title in three separate decades. The Spurs went from grinding out a 78-77 clinching win against the Knicks in 1999 to playing “The Beautiful Game” against Miami in 2014.

Duncan went from a 23-year-old phenom celebrating with the veterans in 1999 to a 38-year-old champion holding his two children on Father’s Day in 2014.

Duncan is responsible for thousands of children and pets named Tim and Duncan, millions of car honks through downtown San Antonio and shared joy between the mothers and daughters and fathers and sons that Duncan united in Silver & Black passion for 19 years.

They all have memories of Duncan hugging the ball or hugging his teammates, and how could they forget. They’ve been lucky enough to see it so many times.

“The city of San Antonio has been an absolute perfect fit for me,” Duncan said in 2007. “I truly believe that we have the best fans in the NBA. They’re die-hard, and you love to have people like that.”

Luck shone on the Spurs in the 1997 NBA Draft Lottery, when they entered with a 21.6 percent chance of the No. 1 overall pick and left with a 100 percent chance to select a generational talent.

Tim Duncan arrived in San Antonio on a muggy June night in 1997, where 6,000 fans gathered at the Alamo to greet the man who would take them to unimagined heights.

Pushed to the podium, he reluctantly delivered a few quick words:

“It’s great being out here. I don’t know what to say. I just hope you’re ready to win a lot of games.”

NBA.com

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Draymond Green faces assault charges in Michigan

Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green was arrested Sunday on assault charges in East Lansing, Michigan.

Green was arrested at 2:28 a.m. ET Sunday and is scheduled for arraignment on July 20. No other details of the arrest were immediately available.

In a statement, the Warriors said they are "aware of news" involving Green.

"At this point, we are collecting information and will have no further comment until we have a better understanding of the situation," the team said.

If convicted, Green would face a maximum of 93 days in jail and a fine of $500.

Green, 26, appeared in 81 games for the Warriors last season and started 23 games in Golden State's playoff run to the NBA Finals, where they lost to the Cleveland Cavaliers in seven games. He missed Game 5 of the Finals for an accumulation of flagrant fouls throughout the postseason.

He played four seasons for Michigan State under coach Tom Izzo. Green is set to join Team USA in August at the Rio Olympics.

Source: Sportscenter.com

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Big bets placed on Warriors to win 2017 title ahead of Kevin Durant's decision

Some bettors in Las Vegas put big money on Golden State to win next year's NBA championship in the days leading up to Kevin Durant's July 4 announcement that he was leaving Oklahoma City to join the Warriors.

On July 3, the Westgate SuperBook took a $20,000 bet on the Warriors at 3-2 to win the 2017 title. Westgate bookmakers treated the bet as an educated-guess wager and adjusted Golden State's odds accordingly.

MGM's sportsbook also reported notable action on the Warriors in the days leading up to Durant's decision, including a "half-dozen" four-figure bets on Golden State at 3-1. The flurry of action at the MGM subsided on the Fourth of July after Durant was officially a Warrior. But by the time it was over, three times more money had been bet on Golden State than any other team.

Kevin Durant joins a loaded roster with the Warriors that also includes two-time reigning MVP Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. Kyle Terada/USA TODAY Sports

"We got popped on the Warriors right before he announced," MGM assistant manager Jeff Stoneback said. "Most of the bets came Saturday and Sunday, and then we got some more on the Fourth."

A week after Durant's decision, the odds to win the 2017 championship have stabilized, with the Warriors sitting as the odds-on favorite at around 2-3 at most shops. The defending champion Cleveland Cavaliers are next at 5-2, followed by the San Antonio Spurs at 8-1.

Without Durant, Oklahoma City is now 30-1 at the SuperBook and 20-1 at the MGM.

"We had quite a few tickets on the Thunder at 5-1," Stoneback said. "Those poor people now can be getting 20-1."

The SuperBook moved the Chicago Bulls from 100-1 to 80-1 with the addition of Dwyane Wade, while dropping the Miami Heat from 25-1 to 80-1.

The SuperBook is offering the Warriors at -150 or the field at +130 and opened a season-win total on Golden State at 68.5. The bulk of the early action is on the field, according to SuperBook assistant manager Jeff Sherman, and the win total has been bet down to 67.5.

The South Point sportsbook is offering a prop bet on the Warriors and Cavaliers versus the field. Golden State and Cleveland are -220 favorites over the field.

William Hill's Nevada sportsbook has a prop on who will have the higher regular-season scoring average: Durant or two-time reigning MVP Stephen Curry. Durant opened as a -175 favorite.

Source:Sportscenter.com

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Attack in Nice: Truck driver identified as 31-year-old French-Tunisian

(CNN)[Breaking news update, posted at 11:31 a.m. ET]

Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhel, 31, a Nice resident born in Tunisia, has been identified as the Nice attacker through fingerprints, French prosecutor François Molins said Friday. Bouhel was a delivery driver and was married; his wife has been detained since Friday morning, Molins said. Bouhel was sentenced this year to a six-month suspended prison sentence for violence, but he was "entirely unknown by intelligence services," Molins said.
The attack began around 10:45 p.m. Thursday, with Bouhel driving a rented, refrigerated truck, French prosecutor François Molins said Friday. The attacker fired several times at three police officers close to a hotel, and the police responded by chasing the vehicle, which still went on for about 300 meters before the officers shot the driver, Molins said. Bouhel was found dead in the passenger seat, he said. In total during the attack, the truck went for about two kilometers along the promenade and hit many spectators there, Molins said.
The truck was rented on Monday and was supposed to have been returned Wednesday.
After the attack, police found in the trailer a bicycle and eight empty pallets. In the cabin, other than the attacker's body, police found a handgun, some ammunition, and a replica handgun and two replica assault rifles, Molins said. In addition, police found in the cab a cell phone and various documents.
A police search of two addresses turned up various phones, IT equipment and documents that investigators are now examining, Molins said.
[Breaking news update, posted at 11:09 a.m. ET]
Ten children or adolescents are among the 84 people killed in Thursday's terror attack in Nice, French prosecutor François Molins said Friday. Another 202 people were injured, including 52 critically. Among the 52 critically injured, 25 are in a coma, Molins said.
[Previous story, posted at 11:03 a.m. ET]
The man who used a truck to fatally mow down dozens of people celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, France, has been identified by authorities as Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhel, a French-Tunisian resident of the southern coastal city.
Bouhel, 31, was named by a French senior government official and an anti-terrorism official as the man responsible for the attack that killed at least 84 people, including young children.
On Friday, authorities began searching an apartment building where Bouhel apparently lived.
 
French President François Hollande said Friday that among the more than 100 injured, 50 people were in critical condition, "between life and death." Staff at the Lenval Hospital in Nice said two children being treated there in the aftermath of the attack had died, and 28 children remained hospitalized.
Hollande described the attack as an "unspeakable act" and vowed that France would "be able to overcome all trials."
"We have an enemy who is going to continue to strike all the people, all the countries who have freedom as a fundamental value," Hollande said.

Dead in the street

The attack was launched on the popular beachfront Promenade des Anglais, which would normally be packed with tourists and residents on a sunny afternoon in July.
But on Friday, screens blocked off more than a mile of the famous boulevard as authorities removed bodies and evidence from the bloody attack.
Just before the carnage Thursday night, hundreds, if not thousands, had gathered on the promenade to watch a colorful display of fireworks and live music for the national holiday.
But as the last firework fizzled, gunfire rang out -- authorities and witnesses say the driver shot from the cab of the truck -- and the truck accelerated down the crowded street.
And again, for the third time in 18 months, a battered France will fly its flags at half-staff to mourn the victims of yet another deadly terrorist attack on its soil. Hollande declared a national mourning period from Saturday to Monday.
Crews covered the dead in the street with blue sheets so emergency vehicles could both avoid running over them and spot them for evacuation.
Slowly, authorities are putting names to the bodies. Three Germans are among the dead, Mayor Reinhard Naumann of Berlin's Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf district said in a statement. They were all women -- two students and a teacher from the Paula-Fürst-School.
"They were just about to graduate at our school, completing the German A levels. We mourn with the parents of the school, their relatives and their friends," the statement said. "We stand with them side by side and we will provide all the necessary support that is now needed."
Americans Sean Copeland, 51, and his son, Brodie, 11, of Texas were also killed in the attack, the Austin American-Statesman reported, citing a statement from the family. U.S. officials confirmed that at least two Americans were killed in the attack, but did not name them.
Apart from those confirmed dead, three Australians, two Chinese and one British national were injured, officials said.

Learn to live with terrorism

France was just preparing to lift its state of emergency, which was put into place in the wake of the November terror attacks in Paris that killed 130 people, the worst attack in France's history.
The state of emergency would have expired later this month, but Prime Minister Manuel Valls said Friday that a bill to extend it would be submitted to parliament by Tuesday.
"France has been struck once again in her flesh, on the 14th of July, on the day of our national celebration," The attacker wanted to "harm the very idea of national unity," he said, adding grimly that France will have to "learn to live with terrorism."
No group has claimed responsibility for the attack. A source close to the investigation tells CNN that the assailant was known to authorities for petty crime violations, based on a provisional identification of the attacker. French authorities had not opened a counter-terrorism surveillance file on him and he was not known to them for jihadism or Islamist extremism.
According to witnesses and a blurry cell phone video, the white truck rolled purposefully toward the crowds just after the fireworks display finished. The video shows the vehicle accelerating as people scattered in front of it and a few people chased it from behind.
The truck plowed through the crowds for more than a mile before police were able to intervene and fatally shoot the driver.
Andy McArdy told CNN he saw the truck driving at high speed along the promenade and the driver "was firing a machine gun while driving." He said everyone ran, many into a restaurant.
"They didn't know where to go, they were looking for an exit -- they were hoping they'd find an exit out the back. They had to stay there for a couple of hours, but people wouldn't even come out -- they were so frightened -- until the police came and said it was OK to come out," he said.

Tired of attacks

Nice is just the latest city to be hit by a terror attack. Istanbul, Orlando, Baghdad, Brussels and Dhaka in Bangladesh are among targets hit in recent months.
 
Twitter user Rabia Chaudry described the recent attacks as "a global, asymmetric war that can't be won."
One user claimed "Je suis Nice," using the phrase that was adopted when staff at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo were gunned down in a coordinated shooting in January 2015.
Landmarks around the world were once again lit up in blue, white and red, as they were after the deadly attacks in the French capital in November.
 
: https://www.instagram.com/p/BH3_ecMhMCw/?taken-by=brett__hobbs

Witnesses describe horror

Eric Dartell was eating at a restaurant on the street where the attack was launched.
"You can see wreckage all along the way: a body, bicycles, street lamps and debris everywhere," he said.
People in the French towon of Nice comfort each other after an attack taht killed at least 84 people.
 
American Dominique Molina, who was watching from a balcony, said the fireworks had just ended and the crowd on the beach was dispersing.
"People were flooding the streets, just walking away from the show, and I heard a lot of loud noises and people were screaming and so to the west, a big moving truck was driving on the promenade, just barreling over people and hitting -- running people over." She estimated the truck moved at 20 to 25 mph.
Police secure an area in Nice, France, where a man carried out an attack on people, shooting at a crowd and ramming into them with a truck .
 
A tourist from Dallas, Kristen Crouch, lamented the climate of violence that spans the globe, from her hometown to the French city, which she was visiting for a friend's wedding.
"It's really sad when you've been marked safe twice on Facebook in the last week. We shouldn't live in a world like that," she said.

'Big step back'

CNN terrorism analyst Paul Cruickshank said "no country in the western world is threatened more by jihadis and terrorism than France."
"This is a big step back here. They are absolutely exhausted after a year and a half of intense efforts to try and protect this country," Cruickshank said.
"The painful reality here is that if it wasn't going to be this promenade, it would have been any other promenade."
France had put intense security in place for Euro 2016, the international soccer tournament that just ended. No major attacks occurred during the event.
While the police response to Thursday's attack appeared to be speedy, questions are now being raised about how the man was able to breach security at the event.
Authorities found several fake rifles and fake grenades inside the truck, according to BFM-TV reporter Cecile Ollivier. A 7.65 caliber handgun was found on the attacker who was known to authorities for weapons possession crimes, but nothing terror related, according to Ollivier.
Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said he was deploying 70 police, medical and technical specialists in order to make sure that the remains of those killed were quickly returned to the families. Hospitals in the city have launched an urgent appeal for blood donors.
The French city of Nice is in shock after a deadly attack.
 

Solidarity, condemnation

Leaders around the world have denounced the brutal incident.
U.S. President Barack Obama issued a statement saying, "We stand in solidarity and partnership with France, our oldest ally, as they respond to and recover from this attack."
Hillary Clinton on France attack: I am sick at heart
 
 
The presumptive nominees for the U.S. presidential election also reacted to the attack, taking strikingly different tones.
Republican Donald Trump said he'd ask for a declaration of war against ISIS while the Democrat candidate-in-waiting, Hillary Clinton, called for greater intelligence gathering to fight terror groups.
The United Nations condemned the "barbaric and cowardly" terror attack.
The U.S. Consulate in Marseille advised U.S. citizens in Nice to call family and friends to notify them that they are safe. The consulate said it was working with authorities to determine whether any U.S. citizens were injured.
Are you in Nice? Did you see what happened on the Promenade des Anglais? If it's ok for you to do so, WhatsApp us on +44 7435 939 154 to share your photos, comments and video. Please tag #CNNiReport in your message.

CNN's Christiane Amanpour, Paul Cruickshank, and journalists Cristiana Moisescu and Bianca Britton contributed to this report.

Source:CNN.com

 
 
 
 
 
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My job nearly drove me to commit suicide

Darryl Warren had what many consider a dream job: he sold BMWs.

Warren entered the world of luxury cars and wealthy clients at age 50. It seemed a step up from his many years in sales at pharmaceutical and food service companies. In his first year, Warren was a top seller at a dealership outside Charlotte, North Carolina. He brought home about $70,000.

 

In his second year, Warren says he sold more cars but was paid $10,000 less. The BMW sales floor was hypercompetitive with a "Hunger Games" feel. A typical day started at 9am and ended at 9pm, or whenever the last customer left. Salesmen regularly worked six days a week, sometimes seven at the end of the month.

"I don't know if it's illegal the way these companies do it, but it's immoral," Warren told CNNMoney. "They literally work people to death."

His body broke down. It started with back pain. Then came the panic attacks, the blood pressure medication and anti-depressants. Most days, life proceeded like this: work, come home late, drink a "fat glass of liquor," make small chat with fiancee, then pass out. For the first time in his life, he had suicidal thoughts. Warren quit in May at the urging of his fiancee.

"You're replaced by a 22-year-old kid who's drawn by the promise of a cheap BMW and lots of money," says Warren, who's now 54 and living off savings while working part-time at a music store.

Related: How I went from middle class to homeless

Spike in middle age suicides

Warren isn't alone in finding himself in an unexpected and depressing place during his midlife years, where he's too young to retire, but can't find a job that matches the one he lost. There's been an alarming spike in suicides and drug and alcohol abuse among 45 to 54 year-old Americans, especially white Americans.

No other rich country has seen anything like this. Nobel prize winning economist Angus Deaton was one of the first to spotlight how white "midlife mortality" in the U.S. jumped from about 381 deaths per 100,000 in the late 1990s to about 415 now.

Everyone is trying to figure out why it's happening. The leading explanation is a lack of "good" jobs, especially for workers without a college degrees.

"Many of the baby-boom generation are the first to find, in midlife, that they will not be better off than were their parents," wrote Deaton and fellow economist Anne Case. Americans with only a high school degree -- or less -- have seen the biggest surge in suicides.

"I never ever in a million years thought I would be 54 and unemployable," says Warren. Since he has a part-time job, he is considered underemployed (not unemployed) by the U.S. government. At the music store, he earns only $10 an hour, with no benefits. It's a job for now, but not liveable.

Workers over 50 -- or even 45 -- are being dubbed the "new unemployables." Unemployment soared during the Great Recession for all ages, but older workers have had the hardest time getting rehired.

Share your story with CNN: How is your job and financial situation?

Older workers: the 'new unemployables'

Olga Aguilar of Florida is worried she is one of the "unemployables." The 56-year-old from Miami was laid off two years ago. Since then, she applies and applies for jobs but hasn't landed anything.

"I want to be useful. I wanted to do something," Aguilar told CNNMoney. "I want to feel like I have contributed something for myself, for my family. It's just a matter of pride."

Despite having a college degree in accounting and many years of experience, Aguilar can't even get interviews anymore. She worked for nearly a decade at her last job for Arise Virtual Solutions, a call center firm. Her dream is to work with animals, but she says she will "try anything" at this point.

Aguilar's husband served for many years in the U.S. Air Force and fortunately has a good private sector job now. They are a proud military family. She is upbeat, but this is not the life she expected to be leading in her 50s, either.

U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez told CNNMoney this is a real problem for America.

"The over 50s, they've got talent, but they've been told hundreds of times their services are not needed," says Perez, who is on the list of possible vice presidential picks for Hillary Clinton.

Older workers have to search for jobs longer

When older workers get laid off -- or quit -- it takes them a lot longer to get rehired than their younger peers. Workers over 45 have to search, on average, over 9 months to get a new job versus about 6 months for workers ages 35 to 44, according to the Labor Department.

Some older workers simply give up looking for work when it takes too long. It's one of reasons America has the lowest level of adults working or searching for a job since the 1970s.

The struggle to find good-paying jobs has become a key issue in the election. For younger workers, the solution is usually more education and retraining, but it's not as obvious what to do to help older workers.

A possible solution: tax credits

Perez says the best tool to aid older workers who have been out of work for more than six months is the Worker Opportunity Tax Credit. Employers get tax credits ranging from about $1,000 to $10,000 if they hire these workers for a trial run. It's akin to a glorified internship program. Often, the older worker gets a full-time job offer after the trial period is over.

While Perez is glad that Congress extended the program at the end of 2015, the problem remains that not enough companies are using it. Many businesses have been flooded with job applications during the recovery. They can be choosey.

There's reason to be hopeful: American companies have been on a hiring boom in recent years. The number of Americans searching over six months for a job has fallen. Today, there are under 2 million people who are long-term unemployed, compared to a record high of 6.8 million people in 2010. Of course, to be counted as long-term unemployed, a person still has to be looking for work, so a lot of people might not be counted today.

All the talk of America being at or near "full employment" doesn't make much sense to Aguilar. She's one of the 750,000 workers over 45 who are still officially counted as long-term unemployed.

"The only conclusion I can come up with for why I can't find work is my age. I don't want to think that, but there are loopholes in everything," says Aguilar.

Source:CNN

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Newt Gingrich: Test every Muslim in U.S. to see if they believe in Sharia

Washington (CNN)Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich on Thursday called for the U.S. to test every person with a Muslim background to see if they believe in Sharia law, and deport those who do.

"Let me be as blunt and direct as I can be. Western civilization is in a war. We should frankly test every person here who is of a Muslim background, and if they believe in Sharia, they should be deported," Gingrich said in an interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity. "Sharia is incompatible with Western civilization. Modern Muslims who have given up Sharia, glad to have them as citizens. Perfectly happy to have them next door."
His remarks came in light of a terror attack in Nice, France, where a large truck plowed through a crowd, killing as many as 80 people. The driver's motivations are not yet known.
Muslims and experts on Islam quickly criticized Gingrich's comments.

Newt Gingrich: Test every Muslim in U.S. to see if they believe in Sharia

Story highlights

  • His remarks came in light of a terror attack in Nice, France
  • Gingrich also said Thursday that calling Islam a "religion of peace" is "bologna"

Washington (CNN)Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich on Thursday called for the U.S. to test every person with a Muslim background to see if they believe in Sharia law, and deport those who do.

Newt Gingrinch speaks on February 27, 2015.
 
"Let me be as blunt and direct as I can be. Western civilization is in a war. We should frankly test every person here who is of a Muslim background, and if they believe in Sharia, they should be deported," Gingrich said in an interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity. "Sharia is incompatible with Western civilization. Modern Muslims who have given up Sharia, glad to have them as citizens. Perfectly happy to have them next door."
His remarks came in light of a terror attack in Nice, France, where a large truck plowed through a crowd, killing as many as 80 people. The driver's motivations are not yet known.
Muslims and experts on Islam quickly criticized Gingrich's comments.
"Apparently a lot of people who know nothing about Islam are now experts on Islam and sharia, telling Muslims what their religion actually says," tweeted Shadi Hamid, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
While Sharia is often defined as "Islamic law," there is no single book of jurisprudence followed by all 1.6 billion Muslims. In fact, there are varying interpretations and legal opinions -- called fatwas -- most of which concern rituals, family matters and personal spirituality. In that way, Sharia is similar to Jewish law, and Israel is among the countries that allow Sharia courts, noted The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg.
Omar Suleiman, a popular Muslim scholar in Dallas, took a defiant stance toward Gingrich's comments.
"Newt Gingrich, I'll make your job easier for you: I believe in every single tenet of my faith," Suleiman wrote in a Facebook post. "Because of that, I speak against extremists overseas and extremists like you and the fraud running for President. You can try to deport me now."
Gingrich followed up on his remarks via Twitter Friday morning.
"Amazing distortions of my interview on Hannity last night. I will do a lengthy Facebook live later this morning n the issue of sharia," Gingirch tweeted. "We clearly need three patterns dealing with Islamist terrorism: for people seeking to get into America, those with green cards, for citizens."

Newt Gingrich: Test every Muslim in U.S. to see if they believe in Sharia

Story highlights

  • His remarks came in light of a terror attack in Nice, France
  • Gingrich also said Thursday that calling Islam a "religion of peace" is "bologna"

Washington (CNN)Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich on Thursday called for the U.S. to test every person with a Muslim background to see if they believe in Sharia law, and deport those who do.

Newt Gingrinch speaks on February 27, 2015.
 
"Let me be as blunt and direct as I can be. Western civilization is in a war. We should frankly test every person here who is of a Muslim background, and if they believe in Sharia, they should be deported," Gingrich said in an interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity. "Sharia is incompatible with Western civilization. Modern Muslims who have given up Sharia, glad to have them as citizens. Perfectly happy to have them next door."
His remarks came in light of a terror attack in Nice, France, where a large truck plowed through a crowd, killing as many as 80 people. The driver's motivations are not yet known.
Muslims and experts on Islam quickly criticized Gingrich's comments.
"Apparently a lot of people who know nothing about Islam are now experts on Islam and sharia, telling Muslims what their religion actually says," tweeted Shadi Hamid, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
While Sharia is often defined as "Islamic law," there is no single book of jurisprudence followed by all 1.6 billion Muslims. In fact, there are varying interpretations and legal opinions -- called fatwas -- most of which concern rituals, family matters and personal spirituality. In that way, Sharia is similar to Jewish law, and Israel is among the countries that allow Sharia courts, noted The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg.
Omar Suleiman, a popular Muslim scholar in Dallas, took a defiant stance toward Gingrich's comments.
"Newt Gingrich, I'll make your job easier for you: I believe in every single tenet of my faith," Suleiman wrote in a Facebook post. "Because of that, I speak against extremists overseas and extremists like you and the fraud running for President. You can try to deport me now."
Gingrich followed up on his remarks via Twitter Friday morning.
"Amazing distortions of my interview on Hannity last night. I will do a lengthy Facebook live later this morning n the issue of sharia," Gingirch tweeted. "We clearly need three patterns dealing with Islamist terrorism: for people seeking to get into America, those with green cards, for citizens."
"How do we ascertain -- how do you possibly ascertain whether or not that person really wants assimilation, really wants a new life, or whether or not they want to expand that caliphate, which is what we're at war against?" Hannity asked Thursday.
"The first step is you have to ask them the questions," Gingrich responded. "The second step is you have to monitor what they're doing on the Internet. The third step is, let me be very clear, you have to monitor the mosques. I mean, if you're not prepared to monitor the mosques, this whole thing is a joke. Where do you think the primary source of recruitment is? Where do you think the primary place of indoctrination is? You've got to look at the madrassas -- if you're a school which is teaching Sharia, you want to expel it from the country."
The comments by Gingrich -- who was a finalist to be Donald Trump's running mate before the real estate mogul tapped Indiana Gov. Mike Pence on Thursday -- are similar to ones made by Trump himself last fall, when he called for surveillance of "certain mosques" to counter terrorist threats.
Gingrich also said Thursday that calling Islam a "religion of peace" is "bologna."
"It's not that Islamists are necessarily evil, but they're not necessarily a religion of peace," Gingrich said.
Gingrich then turned his focus to President Barack Obama, citing many leading Democrats' argument for stricter gun regulation laws after the Orlando terror attack, where 49 individuals where shot and killed inside a nightclub.
"I fully expect by tomorrow morning that President Obama will have rediscovered his left-wing roots and will give a press conference in which he'll explain that the problem is too many trucks," Gingrich said. "If only we had truck regulation, then we wouldn't have problems like Nice because it is trucks that are dangerous. I mean that's the exact analog to Orlando and just tells you how nuts the left wing in America is."
Trump's campaign manager Paul Manafort was asked to respond to Gingrich's comments on CNN's "New Day," but said he didn't know what Gingrich's comments were and what the context was.
"The point is the country's got serious problems dealing with terrorism," Manafort said.
Gingrich was also asked about Trump's decision to select Pence as his running mate. The former House speaker acknowledged it appeared the Indiana governor was the choice, but said, "I've not been officially told."
Source:CNN
 
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Poll: Clinton leads in four swing states

(CNN)Hillary Clinton leads Donald Trump in four crucial swing states, according to a new poll out Friday, good news for the Clinton campaign that has seen other surveys show the presidential race tightening in recent weeks.

The NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll finds Clinton with high single-digit leads in Colorado, Florida, North Carolina and Virginia. Clinton maintains these leads, though at slightly smaller margins, when third-party candidates Gary Johnson and Jill Stein are included.
Clinton leads Trump in Colorado 43% to 35%. Johnson performs best in this state -- he garners 12% support when included in the poll, which shrinks Clinton and Trump's support to 39% and 33%, respectively.
In Florida, Clinton also paces Trump, 44% to 37%. Clinton's lead slips to 5 points with third party candidates factored in.
Clinton is ahead of Trump in North Carolina 44% to 38%, a state which President Barack Obama won for Democrats in 2008 for the first time since 1976. It reverted red in 2012, but polling has shown Clinton competitive there, drawing significant support from minority communities.
Finally, Clinton leads Trump comfortably in Virginia, 44% to 35%. Johnson performs well here too -- Clinton leads Trump 41% to 34% when he's included, and he draws 10%.
A Quinnipiac poll of other battleground states released earlier this week -- Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Iowa -- showed closer races, with Trump leading or tied with Clinton. In Florida, Quinnipiac found Trump up 3 percentage points to Clinton, 42%-39%. Both surveys found about one in five voters in Florida are undecided or don't support either Trump or Clinton.
The WSJ/NBC/Marist findings in Virginia and Colorado findings are in line with other recent polls in those states.
In the WSJ/NBC Marist surveys, both candidates are slowed by steadfastly high unfavorable ratings, with significant majorities in all four states saying they have negative views of Clinton and Trump. And in each state, more than one in 10 say they won't vote for either, or prefer a third party candidate.
The poll also suggests that Trump still faces difficulty unifying the Republican Party after the contentious primary campaign, as he gets no more than 79% of the Republican vote in all four swing states polled.
Additionally, the poll found that gender and educational divides continue to shape the 2016 race, with lower-educated male voters favoring Trump, and more highly educated female voters favoring Clinton.
The WSJ/NBC/Marist poll was conducted from July 5 through 10, and surveyed 871 registered voters in Florida; 907 in North Carolina; 876 in Virginia; and 794 in Colorado. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.3 points in Florida, North Carolina and Virginia, and 3.5 points for Colorado.
Source:CNN
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Bernie Sanders endorses Hillary Clinton

Portsmouth, New Hampshire (CNN)Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders formally declared an end to their political rivalry Tuesday, joining forces to take on a shared enemy: Donald Trump.

"I have come here to make it as clear as possible why I am endorsing Hillary Clinton and why she must become our next president," Sanders said at a joint rally here. "Secretary Clinton has won the Democratic nomination and I congratulate her for that."
The 74-year-old self-described democratic socialist, who has been a thorn in Clinton's side over the last year, pledged to support his former rival through Election Day: "I intend to do everything I can to make certain she will be the next president of the United States."
But there appeared to be little natural chemistry between Clinton and Sanders and their body language was noticeably stiff. The two avoided physical contact after first walking on stage together, and Sanders, in his 30-minute speech, repeatedly mentioned Clinton by name without acknowledging that she was standing next to him looking on.
After concluding his speech, Sanders appeared to move in for a handshake -- which Clinton ignored by stretching out her arms and offering a hug, instead.
"We are joining forces to defeat Donald Trump!" Clinton declared. "I can't help but say how much more enjoyable this election is going to be when we are on the same side. You know what? We are stronger together!"
And even as she struck a victorious tone, Clinton also repeatedly and directly addressed the Sanders supporters in the high school gymnasium.
She walked through a number of policy issues where Sanders had pulled her to the left during the course of the election -- minimum wage; the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, college affordability -- to make a broader concession: the movement that Sanders created was nothing short of a political revolution.
"Sen. Sanders has brought people off the sidelines and into the political process. He has energized and inspired a generation of young people who care deeply about our country," she said. "To everyone here and everyone cross the country who poured your heart and soul into Sen. Sanders' campaign: Thank you."
The long-anticipated unity event, coming less than two weeks ahead of the Democratic National Convention, effectively puts to rest Democratic fears of a political nightmare scenario: that Sanders might sit on his hands in the general election, or worse, run as a third-party candidate on the left.
Clinton aides are confident that Sanders -- who excited the liberal base and won young voters by large margins during the primary -- could be a potent weapon against Trump and help Clinton rev up liberal voters.
But even at an occasion meant to turn the page on their primary battle, Sanders reminded Clinton, who stood next to him on stage, of the millions of Americans who had rejected her.
"Let me begin by thanking the 13 million Americans who voted for me during the Democratic primaries," Sanders said. "Our campaign won the primaries and caucuses in 22 states, and when the roll call at the Democratic National Convention is announced, it will show that we won almost 1,900 delegates."
Tuesday's event is the byproduct of weeks of conversations between Robby Mook, Clinton's campaign manager, and Jeff Weaver, Sanders' top and most trusted aide.
Aides and advisers said that while Sanders and Clinton's June meeting in Washington, D.C., laid the groundwork for the New Hampshire event, it was Mook and Weaver who made the cooperation between the campaigns possible. After Clinton and Sanders left their meeting at the Hilton, Mook and Weaver stayed for two hours to discuss how to work together.
The two campaign managers would continue to talk daily, a Clinton aide said, and Mook traveled to Burlington, Vermont -- where Sanders' campaign is headquartered -- last month so that the two could meet at the Farmhouse Tap and Grill to continue their work together.
With Mook munching on a salad and Weaver eating a burger, the two hammered out how Clinton and Sanders could come together for an event like Tuesday's rally - and how the rivals could work together going forward. Mook also began working directly with Jane Sanders, the senator's wife, in the lead up to policy Clinton's announcements on college affordability and healthcare that moved her closer to Sanders' positions.
Tuesday's endorsement will help Clinton "enormously," said former Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank, a Clinton supporter who co-chairs the party's Rules Committee.
And in a nod to Sanders's successful fundraising efforts that brought in millions of dollars from small donors, with at one time an average donation of $27, Clinton's campaign has made $27 an option on its online donor page.

Hard feelings still persist among Sanders backers

But converting all Sanders fans may be impossible.
"Given, frankly, some of the criticism that he made, I think it will take work to get all of them there," Frank said.
At the rally, where both Sanders and Clinton signs, T-shirts and buttons dotted the crowd, there were plenty of Sanders loyalists who said they are not sold on Clinton -- and might never convert.
Marie Clark, a Sanders supporter from Laconia, New Hampshire, said she remains devoted to Sanders -- or no one. "I'm Bernie or Bust," said Clark, who plans to write Sanders in.
Asked whether she thought that would help Trump, she said, "I think people need to vote for something rather than against something."
"I want to vote for someone who has integrity, someone who has been consistent for 40 years," Clark said. "I will always support a political revolution."
Patti Covino drove from Vermont to attend Tuesday's event and held a sign that read: "Only Bernie."
"I would follow Bernie to the ends of the earth, but I will never follow him to Hillary," Covino said. "I'm not voting for Trump, I will write Bernie in. It doesn't matter what he says."
Trump has sought to appeal to Sanders supporters, saying he better represents Americans angry at the political establishment than Clinton does. Clinton believes Sanders can capture those attracted to Trump, especially in states the senator won such as New Hampshire, Michigan and Wisconsin.
In advance of the event, Trump criticized the endorsement on Twitter, saying Sanders, "totally sold out to Crooked Hillary Clinton."
"I am somewhat surprised that Bernie Sanders was not true to himself and his supporters. They are not happy that he is selling out!" Trump tweeted.
Responding to another Trump tweet, Sanders's campaign decried the presumptive Republican nominee's "big talk."

Clinton efforts to appeal to liberals

Sanders' endorsement had been elusive for Clinton long after she clinched the nomination. For weeks, Sanders refused to concede, continuing to hold rallies and advocate for his agenda, rattling Democrats eager to begin the general election.
But with the primary season firmly behind her, appeasing liberals with the help of Sanders and popular Democrats like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown is now just one piece of her broader challenge of winning over large swaths of the general election electorate, including independents.
On Thursday, Clinton will meet with Senate Democrats at a policy luncheon, a Democratic source said, part of her efforts to coalesce party support around her candidacy.
Clinton's final victory over Sanders comes at the end of a long campaign in which she repeatedly moved to accommodate him and the liberal activists behind his campaign. She reversed her position on sensitive political issues like the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal and the Keystone XL Pipeline -- two projects that progressive staunchly oppose.
And last week, Clinton announced a new college affordability plan that mirrored Sanders' proposals. It proposes tuition-free enrollment in public in-state colleges for families making up to $85,000, with the income benchmark increasing to $125,000 over the course of several years.
Sanders also was able to win concessions from Clinton for language in the Democratic party platform last weekend in Orlando, including a provision calling for a $15-an-hour federal minimum wage.
"We got 80% of what we wanted in this platform," Warren Gunnels, a top Sanders foreign policy adviser, told CNN.
The perception that Sanders has dragged his feet -- and forced Clinton to move left in a protracted primary race -- has frustrated some Democrats.
Jim Kessler, senior vice president of policy at the centrist Democratic think tank Third Way, said Tuesday's endorsement was weeks overdue.
"The idea of trying to extract concessions out of the nominee when we're going to be in a brutal fight against he most unqualified Republican nominee ever was not helpful," Kessler said. "The middle is where this is going to be fought. So any time that the candidate is being pressed to move to the left, you have to ask: am I going to lose votes in the center?"
Mook and other Clinton aides have worked to win over Sanders supporters as well. Mook held meeting with Sanders' delegates in New Hampshire and Vermont. Marlon Marshall, the campaign's director of States and Political Engagement, traveled to the Wyoming to speak with Sanders delegates there. And Jake Sullivan, Clinton's top policy adviser, spoke with Sanders supporters in Washington state.
Clinton's campaign has also worked to hire Sanders aides. Rich Pelletier, Sanders' deputy campaign manager, started sending Marshall resumes last month and the Clinton campaign in Brooklyn has started to bring on former Sanders aides. Clinton's Vermont and Rhode Island general election campaign managers are both former Sanders staffers, as is Clinton's head of college and university engagement.
One Clinton confidant acknowledged that while Tuesday's event will not be a "panacea" to everything that was said during the primary, everyone involved expects Sanders to be "gracious enough."

Green Party leader: 'Berning hearts are breaking'

Sanders' announcement also marks the senator's decision to join the political establishment rather than shun it. Throughout the primary season, Democratic leaders feared that Sanders would go rogue with his political revolution and launch a third party campaign.
Recently, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein had asked Sanders to join forces, even offering him the top spot on the Green Party ticket.
Tuesday morning, Stein began a series of tweets, declaring, "Many Berning hearts are breaking right now."
In an interview with CNN on Monday, Stein expressed her disappointment and warned that many Sanders supporters will not jump on Clinton's bandwagon.
"There are a lot of unhappy campers out there who will not follow Sanders back into the graveyard of the Democratic Party," Stein said. "A revolution that goes back under Hillary Clinton's wing is not a revolution."
Source:CNN
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Mick Jagger becoming a dad again at 72

Papa was a Rolling Stone.

Mick Jagger is set to welcome his eighth child, according to Billboard.
The 72-year-old rocker and his 29-year-old girlfriend, American ballerina Melanie Hamrick are said to be expecting. The pair began dating in 2014.
Jagger has seven children ranging in ages from 45 to 17 and in 2014 became a great grandfather when his then 21-year-old granddaughter Assisi Jackson gave birth to a baby girl.
The Rolling Stones frontman will celebrate his 73rd birthday on July 26.
Jagger now joins band mate Ronnie Wood, 69, whose wife gave birth to twin girls over Memorial Day weekend.
Source:CNN
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Tom Brady announces he won't fight Deflategate suspension further in court

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady announced on his Facebook page that he is no longer going to fight his four-game suspension stemming from Deflategate in the legal system.

He will serve the suspension to start the season.

“I'm very grateful for the overwhelming support I've received from Mr. Kraft, the Kraft family, coach Belichick, my coaches and teammates, the NFLPA, my agents, my loving family and most of all, our fans,” Brady wrote in the post Friday afternoon. “It has been a challenging 18 months and I have made the difficult decision to no longer proceed with the legal process. I'm going to work hard to be the best player I can be for the New England Patriots and I look forward to having the opportunity to return to the field this fall.”

On Wednesday, the 2nd Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals denied his request for an en banc rehearing after a three-judge panel reversed a decision from a lower court to affirm Brady’s suspension.

Last September, U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman had vacated Brady’s suspension.

Now, Brady will be forced to miss games against the Arizona Cardinals, Miami Dolphins, Houston Texans and Buffalo Bills. Backup Jimmy Garoppolo will start in his place, but Brady will be eligible to return Week 5 against the Cleveland Browns.

Source; USA Today

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Questions loom over Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s absence

LOUDON, N.H. – This weekend’s New Hampshire Motor Speedway souvenir program features Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the cover along with a headline asking, “Is This The Year?”

The reference is to the possibility that Earnhardt might finally seriously contend for what would be his first Sprint Cup championship.

Ironically, on a warm, sunny Friday in New England, there were much bigger questions floating around Earnhardt, Hendrick Motorsports and, indeed, the future of NASCAR.

Earnhardt is sitting out Sunday’s race here as he battles concussion-like symptoms, and there is the possibility he could miss more races. Looming over the sport is the possibility that Earnhardt could decide to retire because of health concerns.

There was no confirmation Friday that Earnhardt had been diagnosed with a concussion. The Hendrick team said he was experiencing concussion-like symptoms and that doctors recommended that he not drive.

Hendrick Motorsports announced Friday that retired driver Jeff Gordon would return to racing next week at Indianapolis Motor Speedway if Earnhardt remains sidelined. Alex Bowman is filling in this weekend.

Earnhardt sat out two races in 2012 because of concussions and has admitted to racing with a concussion in the past.

At 41, Earnhardt has had an accomplished career but has fallen short of scoring the Cup championship that his late father won seven times.

No one with the Hendrick team would speculate Friday on his long-term future.

“The most important thing is for this process to play out for him to feel better,” Duchardt said. “At the end of that, the right thing to do will become clear as to how he’s feeling.”

If Earnhardt returns to the No. 88 cockpit next week, he would remain in contention for the Chase for the Sprint Cup, but missing a second race would seriously damage those hopes.

NASCAR spokesman David Higdon said Friday that Earnhardt can’t return to competition until the sanctioning body receives notification from a neurologist that he is able to participate.

“Dale has become more aware over the years,” Duchardt said. “That’s to his credit, and this is important. The only person who knows how you feel is yourself. You have to be self-aware of how your body responds.”

 

Retired driver and ESPN racing analyst Ricky Craven said Friday Earnhardt faces some tough decisions.

“Not everybody will admit this, but you’re making a ridiculous amount of money, and it’s hard to walk away from it,” Craven told USA TODAY Sports. “It’s crazy money. I walked away with a year on my contract, but I was done.”

Craven, who returned to driving after being sidelined by a concussion, said leaving competition is a hard road for every driver to travel.

“I can’t speak for Dale Jr. or anyone else, but he’s got a pretty good life,” Craven said. “He’s obviously found the love of his life (he is engaged to Amy Reimann). He’s traveled to Germany a few times. He’d still be happy (if he quit driving). You always miss competing. It’s part of our DNA.”

Bowman, 23, races part-time for Earnhardt’s Xfinity Series team. He has the opportunity of a lifetime this weekend but said he’s approaching the race with the idea of “plugging into” the 88 team.

“I’m not here to try to be Dale Earnhardt Jr.,” Bowman said. “I’m my own person. I need to plug into the team and give them the best feedback I can. I just want to do my job. Obviously, I’d like to impress people but not do anything crazy.”

Source:USA Today

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Turkish president wants U.S. to send rival cleric home

(CNN)Declaring his government firmly in control, a defiant Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday demanded the United States arrest or extradite an exiled Islamic cleric he blames for a coup attempt that ended with nearly 200 people dead.

The cleric, Fethullah Gulen, living in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania, suggested that overthrow and assassination attempts have been staged in the past though he did not directly accuse Erdogan of deliberately plunging Turkey into chaos.
The upheaval exposes deep discontent within the military ranks. But less than 24 hours after a night of violence, questions remained about who was behind it and why they decided to act now.
The ramifications of the coup attempt on the political system of a NATO ally and partner in the U.S. fight against ISIS also remain unclear.
Erdogan's call for U.S. involvement in punishing his rival comes after Turkish authorities closed the airspace around Turkey's Incirlik Air Base, where his government allows the American military to launch operations in the air campaign against ISIS in Syria and Iraq.
"This country suffered a lot in the hands of the Gulen Movement," Erdogan told throngs of supporters near his home in Istanbul.
"I call on the United States and President Barack Obama ... (to) either arrest Fethullah Gulen or return him to Turkey," he added. "If we are strategic partners or model partners, do what is necessary."

Latest example of Turkey's deteriorating stability

Gulen, a reclusive figure who leads a popular movement called Hizmet, said anyone could have masterminded the coup attempt: nationalists, the opposition. He denied any involvement.
"It could be anything," Gulen told journalists through a translator.
"I have been away from Turkey for 16 years," he said.
Whoever was responsible, the uprising is the latest worrying example of deteriorating stability in a country once promoted to the wider Muslim world as a model of democratic governance and economic prosperity.
Some 14 years after Erdogan's political party swept to power in elections, Turkey teeters on the brink.
At the heart of Erdogan's rivalry with Gulen is a fundamental division in Turkish society between secularists -- some within the country's top military brass -- and Islamists, including the president's AKP party.
Thousands of military officers have been arrested, including the commander of Turkey's 2nd Army, Gen. Adem Huduti.
On Saturday, the Pentagon said U.S. officials were working with Turkey to resume air operations at Incirlik Air Base.
"In the meantime, U.S. Central Command is adjusting flight operations in the counter-ISIL campaign to minimize any effects on the campaign," Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook said.
Clothes and weapons beloging to soldiers involved in the coup attempt lie on the ground abandoned on Bosphorus Bridge.
 

Key air base closed

For now, American airstrike missions from the base have been halted. Turkish officials told the United States the airspace has been closed until they can make sure all Turkish air force elements are in the hands of government forces, a U.S. defense official told CNN on Saturday.
Still, a small number of U.S. planes on missions before the airspace closed were allowed to land at Incirlik, the official said.
Earlier, the U.S. consulate in Adana reported that power to the base had been cut and authorities prevented movement on and off the site.
Cook said U.S. facilities were operating on internal power and the power shutdown did not affect base operations. Defense department personnel in the area were "safe and secure," he said.
The base is home to the Turkish Air Force and the U.S. Air Force's 39th Air Base Wing, which includes about 1,500 American personnel, according to the base website.

Uprising 'under control'

Before cheering supporters on Saturday, Erdogan affirmed his control.
"You know how you went out in to the squares?" he asked. "That's what ruined their plot. And for the next week we need to continue this solidarity, we must keep up these meetings."
The country's institutions were "back at work," he said.
"There are a lot of generals and colonels that were detained but those who want to set the Turkish people and the Turkish military against each other, let us not fall prey to their plot."
Chaos erupted the night before when military tanks rolled onto the streets of Ankara and Istanbul and soldiers blocked the famous Bosphorus Bridge.
The military's claim of a takeover was read on state broadcaster TRT. The anchor said the military imposed martial law.
The military said it wanted to maintain democratic order and that the government had "lost all legitimacy."
But the coup attempt lost momentum after Erdogan returned from vacation at the seaside resort of Marmaris. By the time he re-emerged after hours of silence, dozens had died.
The prime minister's officer said at least 161 civilians and at least 20 coup plotters were killed.
Of the nearly 200 deaths, most were police officers killed in a gun battle with a helicopter near the Parliament complex in Ankara, NTV reported. The building was damaged. Another 1,140 people were wounded.
At least 2,839 military officers were detained, a source in the President's office said. The Ankara chief public prosecutor's office took nearly 200 top Turkish court officials into custody, Anatolian News Agency reported Saturday.
The officials include 140 members of the Supreme Court and 48 members of the Council of State, one of Turkey's three high courts.

8 seek asylum in Greece

A Turkish helicopter carrying eight men landed in Greece Saturday and the men aboard requested political asylum, Greek government spokeswoman Olga Gerovasili said.
Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu in a tweet requested "the immediate surrender of eight heinous soldiers."
But Greece will not necessarily return the alleged coup plotters, the Greek foreign minister said Saturday in a statement.
The asylum request "will be examined based on the provisions of Greek and international law," Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Kotzias said.
Cavusoglu and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry spoke Saturday evening, according to State Department spokesman John Kirby.
Kerry gave his support to the Turkish government and said the United States backs Turkey in taking measures to protect its civilians.
The U.S. statement also said, "Secretary Kerry also urged restraint by the Turkish government and respect for due process -- and its international obligations -- as it investigates and uncovers additional information about those involved. He made clear that the United States would be willing to provide assistance to Turkish authorities conducting this investigation, but that public insinuations or claims about any role by the United States in the failed coup attempt are utterly false and harmful to our bilateral relations."
Bombs struck the Parliament building in Ankara. A helicopter allegedly stolen by coup plotters was shot down by an F-16.
Turkish people look at a burned car in Istanbul on Saturday.
 

The surrender

Shortly after dawn, however, video footage showed soldiers surrendering. Hundreds turned themselves in to police in Ankara, Turkish state media reported.
They walked away from tanks and abandoned their posts on the Bosphorus Bridge connecting the European and Asian sides of Istanbul.
Turkish Airlines resumed flights out of Istanbul Ataturk airport, which had been overrun by protesters.
A Turkish police officer embracea a man on a tank after the military position was taken over at the Anatolian side at Uskudar in Istanbul on Saturday.
 
Erdogan was elected Prime Minister in 2003. Under his rule, Turkey became a powerhouse in the Middle East. His reign came to an end in 2014, and his own party's rules prevented him from seeking a fourth term.
Source:CNN.com
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Taylor Swift is top-earning celebrity

While the world has been watching Taylor Swift's love life play out, she's been amassing some serious coin.

Swift has nabbed the top spot on the 2016 Forbes Celebrity 100 list. The singer earned an estimated $170 million in the past year, driven in part by her very successful 1989 World Tour. Swift more than doubled her take from last year, when she earned $80 million.

"She smashed the Rolling Stones' North American touring record, grossing $200 million on the continent en route to quarter of a billion dollars in total," Forbes reports. "She also pads her pocketbook by shilling for brands including Diet Coke, Keds and Apple."

Musical artists One Direction came in second on this year's list with $110 million. Rounding out the top 5 were author James Patterson ($95 million); talk show host Dr. Phil McGraw and soccer superstar Cristiano Ronaldo (both $88 million); and comedian Kevin Hart ($87.5 million).

The top 10 list of highest-paid celebs is as follows:

1. Taylor Swift ($170 million)

2. One Direction ($110 million)

3. James Patterson ($95 million)

4. Dr. Phil McGraw ($88 million)

5. Cristiano Ronaldo ($88 million)

6. Kevin Hart ($87.5 million)

7. Howard Stern ($85 million)

8. Lionel Messi ($81.5 million)

9. Adele ($80.5 million)

10. Rush Limbaugh ($79 million)

One sad note: Had Swift stayed with her now ex-boo, superstar DJ/producer Calvin Harris, she would have topped two lists.

With his $63 million in earnings, the pair would have been the top-earning Celebrity 100 couple, outpacing Beyonce and Jay Z, who earned a combined $107.5 million over the past year.

Shake it off, Taylor -- there's always next year.

Source:CNN

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Men fall from cliff playing Pokémon Go

(CNN)If all your friends jumped off a cliff, would you too? What if your Pokémon took you there?

Two men in their early 20s fell an estimated 50 to 90 feet down a cliff in Encinitas, California, on Wednesday afternoon while playing "Pokémon Go," San Diego County Sheriff's Department Sgt. Rich Eaton said. The men sustained injuries, although the extent is not clear.
Pokémon Go is a free-to-play app that gets users up and moving in the real world to capture fictional "pocket monsters" known as Pokémon. The goal is to capture as many of the more than hundred species of animated Pokémon as you can.
Apparently it wasn't enough that the app warns users to stay aware of surroundings or that signs posted on a fence near the cliff said "No Trespassing" and "Do Not Cross." When firefighters arrived at the scene, one of the men was at the bottom of the cliff while the other was three-quarters of the way down and had to be hoisted up, Eaton said.
Both men were transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla. They were not charged with trespassing.
Eaton encourages players to be careful. "It's not worth life or limb," he said
In parts of San Diego County, there are warning signs for gamers not to play while driving. San Diego Gas and Electric tweeted a warning to stay away from electric lines and substations when catching Pokémon.

Men fall from cliff playing Pokémon Go

Story highlights

  • Two men fell off a cliff while playing Pokémon Go
  • Law enforcement official reminds players "it's not worth life or limb"
 

(CNN)If all your friends jumped off a cliff, would you too? What if your Pokémon took you there?

Two men in their early 20s fell an estimated 50 to 90 feet down a cliff in Encinitas, California, on Wednesday afternoon while playing "Pokémon Go," San Diego County Sheriff's Department Sgt. Rich Eaton said. The men sustained injuries, although the extent is not clear.
Pokémon Go is a free-to-play app that gets users up and moving in the real world to capture fictional "pocket monsters" known as Pokémon. The goal is to capture as many of the more than hundred species of animated Pokémon as you can.
Apparently it wasn't enough that the app warns users to stay aware of surroundings or that signs posted on a fence near the cliff said "No Trespassing" and "Do Not Cross." When firefighters arrived at the scene, one of the men was at the bottom of the cliff while the other was three-quarters of the way down and had to be hoisted up, Eaton said.
Both men were transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla. They were not charged with trespassing.
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Eaton encourages players to be careful. "It's not worth life or limb," he said
In parts of San Diego County, there are warning signs for gamers not to play while driving. San Diego Gas and Electric tweeted a warning to stay away from electric lines and substations when catching Pokémon.
This is the latest among many unexpected situations gamers have found themselves in, despite the game being released just more than a week ago. In one case, armed robbers lured lone players of the wildly popular augmented reality game to isolated locations. In another case, the game led a teen to discover a dead body.
Source:CNN.com
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Cancer research could help the search towards an HIV cure

(CNN) HIV/AIDS is perhaps the most important global health crisis in modern history. Dramatic progress has been made in controlling the virus, but efforts to find a cure are still in its infancy.

To date only one individual, Timothy Brown, is known to have been cured of HIV infection.
The process that cured Mr. Brown, a dangerous and expensive stem cell transplant from a donor known to be immune to HIV, was related to his treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. It is not a practical route to cure others, but it did prove one critical point -- curing HIV is possible.
Finding a safe, affordable and scalable cure for HIV is a formidable challenge. Scientists have known for decades that HIV infection persists even when viral replication is effectively controlled by antiretroviral therapy. The virus can hide inside cells forever during therapy and re-emerge rapidly, and at any time, once treatment is stopped.
Despite these challenges, the quest to develop a cure for HIV has made remarkable advances over the past four years. Researchers have not been able to eliminate the virus from anyone except Mr. Brown, but in a handful of cases very early treatment with antiretroviral therapy has enabled an individual's immune system to control the virus, without any need for treatment. These rare "post-treatment controllers" stay off therapy for years without any evidence of the disease, raising the possibility that pathways to achieving lasting control of the infection in the absence of treatment—a remission using the cancer model—may be available for discovery.

Linking HIV to Cancer

The parallels between HIV and cancer are striking. We now know that controlling HIV in the absence of therapy will require the generation and maintenance of powerful CD8+ -- or "killer" - T cells that can target vulnerable parts of the virus. The challenge is remarkably similar to that in oncology, where the goal of innovative therapies is to generate killer T cells that recognize and clear cancer cells.
Many of the key immune pathways now being therapeutically manipulated to cure cancer were first discovered in studies of chronic viral infections, particularly HIV. For example, inhibitory pathways known as immune checkpoint blockers -- that control immune responses and ensure self-tolerance -- can reverse the brakes on killer T cells, enabling them to clear cancer (and presumably HIV-infected cells). Many people with once fatal cancers are now in long-term remission as a consequence of these new approaches.
Efforts are now underway to determine if these cancer therapies can be used to build up the immune system of patients with HIV in such a way that they too can achieve a durable and perhaps life-long treatment-free state of remission.
Both disciplines also struggle with the need to quantify the burden of disease. Cancer cells and HIV-infected cells are exceedingly difficult to distinguish from normal cells. They often also reside in tissues that are difficult to access. Intense efforts are therefore being aimed at quantifying the size, and distribution, of the disease in both disciplines, with often-similar approaches being taken.
Timothy Brown was cured by the work of a highly resourceful team of oncologists. His case illustrates that we need to do more to bring HIV and cancer research together -- incentivizing scientists to work across diseases and ensuring that research funding allows for these synergies.
Transformative advances in the cancer field may well provide inspiration for future directions of a strategy to guide those working towards an HIV cure.
Source: CNN
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The Fastest Way To Pay Off $10,000 In Credit Card Debt

What's the best way to pay down a credit card balance as quickly as possible, while paying the least in interest, and without hurting your credit? What follows is a powerful method recommended by the most astute personal finance experts* to achieve exactly those objectives. It's extremely effective, completely legal, and leverages programs created by credit card issuers to your advantage. Follow these steps and start to become credit card debt-free.

Step 1: Use A Powerful Tool To Immediately Stop Paying Interest On Your Balance

Think of someone carrying a credit card balance like a patient who enters an emergency room bleeding badly. The first thing a doctor will do is stop the bleeding. It's no different when attacking a credit card balance; the first thing you do is stop the interest charges.

There's a simple way to do this, and it's brilliance is that it actually uses the banks' marketing offers to your advantage: find a card offering a long "0% intro APR balance transfer" promotional offer, and transfer your balance to it. These are cards which offer new customers a long period of time (often as much as 18 months) during which the card charges no interest on all balances transferred to it. We constantly track all the cards in the marketplace in order to find the ones currently offering the longest 0% intro periods.

If you need more motivation, just think of this: on a $10,000 balance, $150 of a $200 monthly payment would get vacuumed up by interest charges.** That leaves only $50 of your $200 that actually reduces your balance, the rest vanishing into bank pockets. That's just brutal. Use our reviews to find a card which offers the longest possible no-interest period while charging low, or even no fees. Moving your balances to the card you choose will stop the bleeding, allowing you to move on to step two.

Step 2: Power Through Your Balance During The 0% Period.

Once you've transferred your balances and put a stop to the interest charges, it's time to capitalize on the interest-free period to really break free of the debt. The best part of this is how simple it is: just keep making the payments you used to make when you had to pay big interest payments. Going back to the $10,000 example above, if you transferred that balance onto a card like the Chase Slate (which offers 15 months of 0% intro APR with no transfer fee) and maintained the same $200 monthly payment, you can see how much faster you'll be reducing your balance in the chart below.

As you can see, without using the 0% card, the same $200 monthly payments barely make any headway. It's like swimming upstream, or walking while taking a step back for every two steps forward. That's no way to swim or walk, and attempting to pay off your cards while paying high card interest rates is no way to manage your finances. Move your balances onto one of the cards below, stop getting crushed by interest, and start making real progress toward getting rid of your card debt.

Source: Lending Tree.com

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Baton Rouge shooting: 3 officers killed, hunt on for shooters

(CNN)Latest update:

The dead suspect in the Baton Rouge shooting was wearing all black and was wearing a mask, Baton Rouge Police Department Sgt. Don Coppola said. Coppola said he did not know what the mask looked like, but that it was "some type of mask to conceal (the shooter's) identity."
-- One suspect is dead, and two others may be at large
-- Police are looking for anyone wearing army fatigues, all black or possibly a mask
Previous story:
In a city already tense after a high-profile police shooting of an African-American man, three Baton Rouge police officers were killed and three others wounded Sunday. Officials think the attack on the officers is the work of multiple gunmen.
Police received a call of a "suspicious person walking down Airline Highway with an assault rifle," a source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN. When police arrived, the shooting began.
One of the suspects is dead. Authorities believe two others may be at large.
"If they are wearing army fatigues; if they are wearing all black; if they are wearing a mask; if they are wearing anything that's out there, please, give us a call," said Baton Rouge Police Cpl. L.J. McKneely.
Investigators are reviewing a video of the Baton Rouge firefight posted to social media to see who might have been involved, a law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN's Pamela Brown. The video has since been taken down.
The firefight took place in a part of town that the source described as rough. The area is a known drug trafficking area. It is a location where police often go to grab coffee.
President Obama quickly issued a statement condemning the attack on law enforcement.
"For the second time in two weeks, police officers who put their lives on the line for ours every day were doing their job when they were killed in a cowardly and reprehensible assault," Obama said. "These are attacks on public servants, on the rule of law, and on civilized society, and they have to stop. ...These attacks are the work of cowards who speak for no one. They right no wrongs. They advance no causes."
The law enforcement official described the situation in Baton Rouge as a powder keg.
The shooting took place around 9 a.m. (10 a.m. ET) in the city of about 230,000 people.
"There was no talking, just shooting," McKneely said.
By noon, authorities had secured the scene and were making sure there weren't any explosives left behind.
"After that, we're going to gather as much information as we can and work this case as best as we can to find all individuals that were involved in this," McKneely said.
"Somebody might have seen something suspicious, may know of guys plotting to do this. That's why we're reaching out to the community."
Since the shooting death of Alton Sterling by Baton Rouge police earlier this month, the department has worried about credible threats against officers.
It has been an emotionally charged few days across the country because of the protests stemming from the Sterling shooting and the shooting by police of Philando Castile in Minnesota, plus the ambush on Dallas police officers on July 7 in which a sniper killed five officers.
"This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing," Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said.
Kip Holden, the mayor-president of East Baton Rouge Parish, said "everything is moving fast."
"There is still an active scene. They are investigating," he said. "Right now we are trying to get our arms around everything."
Source: CNN.com
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Investors prefer Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump

Americans with money in the stock market have a clear preference for the next president of the United States: Hillary Clinton.

Among investors, 45% think Clinton would be better for the stock market versus 34% for Trump, according to the latest quarterly survey from E*Trade Financial (ETFC). The survey captures the views of people with at least $10,000 in an online trading account.

 

It may not be a surprise that Clinton came out on top. The U.S. stock market is hitting record highs. Serious investors with thousands (if not millions) in the market probably wouldn't mind more of the same from Washington D.C.: a Democrat in the White House (Clinton) and Republicans keeping control of the House of Representatives.

"The markets love divided government," says Greg Valliere of Horizon Investments. "Clinton would be check-mated in the GOP House."

E*Trade also asked investors which candidate would do a better for the economy. The results were similar, although not as strong for the Democrat: 41% said Clinton versus 33% for Trump. The rest of the respondents said "other" or "none of the above."

The economy is the No. 1 issue in Election 2016. America may have low unemployment and decent growth, but economic anxiety remains high. Trade, reining in Wall Street and the need for more good-paying jobs have dominated the campaign trail. Even among investors surveyed by E*Trade, the vast majority gave the U.S. economy an mediocre "B" or "C" grade.

Clinton and Trump are fighting to convince voters they are the best candidate to lift the economy.

In other polls, when ALL voters are asked who would be the better for the economy, Trump has the edge. But there seems to be a consensus emerging on Wall Street and Silicon Valley that Clinton would be the better choice for the business and tech worlds. She has proposed a major boost to infrastructure spending to repair America's roads, bridges and IT, and she wants to raise taxes on the rich.

There are concerns that Trump's plans to scale back foreign trade and put hefty tariffs on goods coming from China could start a trade war and sink the U.S. economy into a recession. The economists at Moody's Analytics predict 3.5 million job losses under President Trump and a stock market correction (if not worse). A Trump adviser calls the Moody's analysis "garbage" and argues that Trump's big tax cuts for businesses and individuals will spur growth.

The selection of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as Trump's running mate casts doubt on how fervent a President Trump would be on curtailing trade. Pence has been a strong supporter of free trade in the past, including voting in favor of trade deals with Panama, Colombia and South Korea while he was in Congress.

The E*Trade survey was conducted July 2 to July 11 after the Brexit vote but before Trump's vice presidential selection.

Source:CNN.com

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Donald Trump Forces G.O.P. to Choose Between Insularity and Outreach

As Republicans stream into Cleveland to nominate Donald J. Trump for president, they confront a party divided and deeply imperiled by his racially divisive campaign. He has called for cracking down on Muslims and undocumented immigrants, stoked fears of crime and terrorism and repeatedly declared that the United States is in a war for its very survival.

 

But amid gloom about Republican prospects in November, Mr. Trump may have endangered the party in a more lasting way: by forging a coalition of white voters driven primarily by themes of hard-right nationalism and cultural identity.

 

Republicans have wrestled for years with the push and pull of seeking to win over new groups of voters while tending to their overwhelmingly white and conservative base. Now, Mr. Trump’s candidacy may force them into making a fateful choice: whether to fully embrace the Trump model and become, effectively, a party of white identity politics, or to pursue a broader political coalition by repudiating Mr. Trump’s ideas — and many of the voters he has gathered behind his campaign.

 

With his diatribes against Islam, immigration from Mexico and economic competition from Asia, Mr. Trump has amassed dominant support from restive white voters. His political approach would have Republicans court working-class and rural whites, mainly in the South and Midwest, at the grievous cost of alienating minorities and women, who often decide presidential races.

 

In his choice of running mate, Mr. Trump moved to further shore up his support among Midwestern whites. Passing over a throng of nonwhite Republicans recently elected to high office, he settled on Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana, whose only demonstrated appeal is to conservative-leaning whites in the Rust Belt.

The coalition that carried Mr. Trump to the nomination he will formally claim at the Republican National Convention this week in Cleveland is likely to remain a powerful force on the right, even if he is defeated in November. But its continued sway within the party could suffocate Republicans at the national level, stifling attempts to expand beyond a dwindling base of aggrieved older voters.

 

A starkly different path forward for Republicans would involve rejecting that base and the ideas that Mr. Trump has used to assemble it.

 

In order to build a winning party again, some Republican leaders say, the party will have to disavow Mr. Trump’s exclusionary message, even at the price of driving away voters at the core of the Republican base — perhaps a third or more of the party.

 

This approach would amount to a highly risky lurch away from the faction that made Mr. Trump the Republican nominee, and toward a community of female, Latino and Asian voters who have never been reliable Republicans. Should the effort falter, and Republicans fail to win a second look from these Democratic-leaning groups, they could find themselves stranded with virtually no base at all.

 

If they are divided over the proper course forward, Republican leaders agree that a wrenching struggle is coming.

 

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan predicted that the aftermath of the election would bring “a fight for the soul of our party,” and said Republicans would have to reject the politics of racial resentment, which he called “a loser.”

 

“Our job is not to preach to a shrinking choir; it’s to win converts,” said Mr. Ryan, who has endorsed Mr. Trump but criticizes his pronouncements with regularity.

 

Senator Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona, an outspoken critic of Mr. Trump who plans to skip the convention, said more bluntly that the party should be prepared to break with Mr. Trump and the voters who have cheered his pledges to deport millions of undocumented immigrants and ban Muslims from entering the country.

“You’ve got to hope that, if this race keeps going the way it looks to be going, that it’s enough of a jolt to wake people up and say we don’t want to be relegated to second place in every future presidential campaign,” Mr. Flake said.

 

He suggested a purge of racists from the party that would recall the expulsion of the John Birch Society, a fringe nationalist group, from Republican ranks a half-century ago.

 

“Those who want a Muslim ban, those who will disparage individuals or groups — yes, we ought to, we need to,” Mr. Flake said.

 

Many Republicans balk at the idea of executing a kind of mass deportation from within the party’s base, arguing that Mr. Trump has demonstrated the potency of issues outside the establishment Republican catechism, like the mix of trade protectionism, draconian immigration restrictions and resistance to foreign wars summed up in his slogan “America First.”

 

Republican and Democratic strategists who have studied his coalition believe Mr. Trump’s following may constitute one-third to one-half of Republican primary voters — people drawn principally to his willingness to defy the sensitivities of racial politics and to channel populist anger over immigration and economic change.

 

Republicans have long struggled to navigate elections in which the party’s base holds views at odds with the larger national electorate on issues like same-sex marriage and gun rights. But Mr. Trump has exacerbated this perennial challenge, focusing the intraparty debate almost entirely on racially charged arguments about immigration and Islam that make the old conservative-moderate divisions seem quaint.

 

In a sense, he has expanded to potentially catastrophic proportions the racial and cultural dilemma that confronted Mitt Romney in 2012. Mr. Romney ran to the right on immigration in the primaries, pledging to clamp down on the Mexican border and push undocumented workers out of the country. He won nearly 60 percent of the white vote against President Obama, but lost by historic margins among Hispanic and Asian voters.

 

Mr. Trump appears likely to lose nonwhites in an even greater landslide than Mr. Romney.

Whit Ayres, a Republican pollster who wrote a book urging Republicans to pursue nonwhite voters, said Mr. Trump would have to win about 70 percent of whites to make up the difference, an exceedingly daunting political task.

That kind of political calculus has not yet budged Mr. Trump’s most fervent backers, who see the 2016 race as a battle over national identity.

 

The appeal of a Trump-like message may go beyond even the share of primary voters that Mr. Trump captured: Exit polls found solid majorities of Republican primary voters supportive of his pledge to block Muslims from entering the country. In the general election, polls show most voters oppose that plan.

 

Last fall, the immigration reform group FWD.us conducted polls in three swing states testing arguments against Mr. Trump, and found that most voters opposed his pledge to round up and deport millions of undocumented immigrants — but “very conservative” Republicans tended to support the idea.

Eric Cantor, a Republican from Virginia and a former House majority leader, warned that Republicans would have to thoroughly repudiate ideas like the Muslim ban after November. “I do know now with Trump, he is appealing to a core that is very passionate and intense,” Mr. Cantor said, “but what we’re seeing in so many of the public polls now is that it has turned off many more than that.”
 

Mr. Trump’s approach is an alluring path to prominence on the right: Already, a handful of up-and-coming Republicans from the party’s conservative wing have moved to court his core voters. Some have argued his message could be more potent in the hands of a less flawed messenger.

Mr. Pence, who sharply criticized some of Mr. Trump’s proposals in the Republican primary race, campaigned hard to join his ticket in the general election.
Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, a first-term lawmaker who has taken steps toward a future presidential race, argued that the party should be prepared to go further than Mr. Trump and propose new restrictions on even legal immigration.

“Sometimes being tough-minded is the compassionate approach,” Mr. Cotton said, rejecting the less-strident “compassionate conservatism” espoused by George W. Bush. “I don’t see much compassion in continuing to bring a million legal immigrants to this country a year when our work force participation rate is at historic lows, when we have record high numbers of people on food stamps and disability.”

Laura Ingraham, a conservative radio host supportive of Mr. Trump, said the party’s future base would have to be made up of “working-class nationalists,” who have been drawn to Mr. Trump and reject the Bush-era policies around immigration and trade. “The next governing coalition that calls itself conservative will have to reflect the views of the pro-Trump voters,” she said.
The hope among some Republican leaders is that Mr. Trump’s supporters may be placated, after a bruising defeat, by reshaping the party’s platform on a few key issues like trade and national security, without redefining Republican values from top to bottom in racial terms.
Yet the struggle to define Republican values may not come at a time, or on terms, of the party’s own choosing: Should Hillary Clinton win the presidency, Democrats are expected to press again for a comprehensive immigration reform law, along the lines of a bipartisan deal that passed the Senate in 2013 before stalling in the House. The fight could split the Republican Party next year much as Mr. Trump’s campaign has in 2016.
Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, a youthful military veteran who has eyed higher office, said he would “push back really hard” on any effort on the right to harden the party’s line on immigration after a Trump defeat.
Mr. Kinzinger said the party would have to reintroduce itself to the American people in less bluntly divisive terms. After 12 years without a Republican president, he said, Republicans would have to “take our conservative principles and re-explain what they are, and attract people that don’t necessarily traditionally vote Republican.”
With both paths forward carrying painful risks, some Republicans fear the party will chart its course next year much as it did after losing in 2008 and 2012: by simply muddling onward.

Mr. Flake invoked the Republican National Committee’s so-called autopsy report after the 2012 campaign, which argued for minority outreach and immigration reform, as a sign of the futility of the party’s predicament.

“We’ll conclude we have to have a bigger tent and got to be more inclusive, particularly with Hispanics and other growing demographic groups,” said Mr. Flake, looking ahead to the months after this November. “And then maybe some populist will rise up again and we’ll go through the whole same process again.”

Source:CNN.com

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Can Running Make You Smarter?

strengthen your mind, you may first want to exert your leg muscles, according to a sophisticated new experiment involving people, mice and monkeys. The study’s results suggest that long-term endurance exercise such as running can alter muscles in ways that then jump-start changes in the brain, helping to fortify learning and memory.

I often have written about the benefits of exercise for the brain and, in particular, how, when lab rodents or other animals exercise, they create extra neurons in their brains, a process known as neurogenesis. These new cells then cluster in portions of the brain critical for thinking and recollection.

Even more telling, other experiments have found that animals living in cages enlivened with colored toys, flavored varieties of water and other enrichments wind up showing greater neurogenesis than animals in drab, standard cages. But animals given access to running wheels, even if they don’t also have all of the toys and other party-cage extras, develop the most new brain cells of all.

These experiments strongly suggest that while mental stimulation is important for brain health, physical stimulation is even more potent.

But so far scientists have not teased out precisely how physical movement remakes the brain, although all agree that the process is bogglingly complex.

Fascinated by that complexity, researchers at the National Institutes of Health recently began to wonder whether some of the necessary steps might be taking place far from the brain itself, and specifically, in the muscles, which are the body part most affected by exercise. Working muscles contract, burn fuel and pump out a wide variety of proteins and other substances.

The N.I.H. researchers suspected that some of those substances migrated from the muscles into the bloodstream and then to the brain, where they most likely contributed to brain health.

But which substances were involved was largely a mystery.

So for the new study, which was published last month in Cell Metabolism, the N.I.H. researchers first isolated muscle cells from mice in petri dishes and doused them with a peptide that affects cell metabolism in ways that mimic aerobic exercise. In effect, they made the cells think that they were running.

Then, using a technique called mass spectrometry, the scientists analyzed the many chemicals that the muscle cells released after their pseudo-workouts, focusing on those few that can cross the blood-brain barrier.

They zeroed in on one substance in particular, a protein called cathepsin B. The protein is known to help sore muscles recover, in part by helping to clear away cellular debris, but it had not previously been considered part of the chain linking exercise to brain health.

To determine whether cathepsin B might, in fact, be involved in brain health, the researchers added a little of the protein to living neurons in other petri dishes. They found that those brain cells started making more proteins related to neurogenesis.

Cathepsin B also proved to be abundant in the bloodstreams of mice, monkeys and people who took up running, the scientists found. In experiments undertaken in collaboration with colleagues in Germany, the researchers had mice run for several weeks, while rhesus monkeys and young men and women took to treadmills for four months, exercising vigorously about three times a week for approximately an hour or sometimes longer.

During that time, the concentrations of cathepsin B in the jogging animals and people steadily rose, the researchers found, and all of the runners began to perform better on various tests of memory and thinking.

Most striking, in the human volunteers, the men and women whose fitness had increased the most — suggesting that they had run particularly intensely — not only had the highest levels of cathepsin B in their blood but also the most-improved test scores.

Finally, because there’s nothing like removing something from the body to underscore how important it may be, the scientists bred mice without the ability to create cathepsin B, including after exercise. The researchers had those mice and other, normal animals run for a week, then taxed their ability to learn and retain information.

After running, the normal mice learned more rapidly than they had before and also held on to those new memories well. But the animals that could not produce cathepsin B learned haltingly and soon forgot their new skills. Running had not helped them to become smarter.

The lesson of these experiments is that our brains appear to function better when they are awash in cathepsin B and we make more cathepsin B when we exercise, says Henriette van Praag, an investigator at the National Institute on Aging at the N.I.H. who oversaw this study.

Of course, increases in cathepsin B explain only part of the benefits of exercise for the brain, she said. She and her colleagues plan to continue looking for other mechanisms in future studies.

They also hope to learn more about how much exercise is necessary to gain brain benefits. The regimen that the human runners followed in this study was “fairly intensive,” she said, but it’s possible that lighter workouts would be almost as effective.

“There is good reason to think,” she said, “that any amount of exercise is going to be better than none” for brain health.

Source:NY Times

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Twist in Zika Outbreak: New York Case Shows Women Can Spread It to Men

The first case of female-to-male sexual transmission of the Zika virus has been documented in New York City, raising the prospect that the disease could spread more widely beyond the countries where it is already endemic and largely transmitted by mosquitoes.

 

For months, there has been growing concern about the dangers of sexual transmission, but until now the virus has been thought to pass only from men to women or between two men.

 

“This represents the first reported occurrence of female-to-male sexual transmission of Zika virus,” said a report issued on Friday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

 

The evidence of a previously undocumented transmission means is the latest twist in a viral outbreak that continues to baffle and surprise leading experts. It is prompting officials to rethink, once again, the guidance for health care providers and the general public on how to limit the danger of infection, as the pool of those who could be at risk widens.

 

Much about how the virus works is a mystery, and it remains challenging to detect; 80 percent of those infected show no symptoms. For those who do get sick, the illness is often mild, and there is no treatment.

 

But Zika can pose a dire risk to pregnant women. It targets developing nerve cells in fetuses and can lead to a birth defect called microcephaly, in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and brain damage. It may also cause developmental problems after birth.

 

Zika is primarily transmitted by the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which thrives in warm, tropical climates. But 11 countries have documented cases of sexual transmission from a man to a woman. Among the 1,130 people who have received a Zika diagnosis in the continental United States, including 320 pregnant women, the C.D.C. has reported 15 cases of sexual transmission.

In a reflection of the urgency of the situation, White House officials joined with congressional leaders and public health officials this month to denounce the failure of lawmakers to provide much-needed funding to combat the virus. The legislative session in Congress ended on Thursday with lawmakers failing to provide money to fight it.

Continue reading the main story

 

“The more we learn about Zika, the more concerned we are,” Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, the director of the C.D.C., said during a recent conference call with reporters.

At least seven children have been born with birth defects and five pregnancy losses related to Zika in the United States. The lifetime cost of care is estimated to be $10 million for each sick child.

 

“Each case is a tragedy,” Dr. Frieden said. “A child that may never walk or live independently.”

 

The New York case is the first in which a man was infected by a woman, and it raises the prospect that other men — with no travel history to Zika-affected areas and no reason to suspect that they might have the virus — could become infected and pass the virus on, creating a new chain of transmission.

 

In the report, researchers found that a man, who was in his 20s and did not travel outside the United States during the year before his illness, contracted the virus after one instance of vaginal intercourse, without a condom, with a woman who had recently returned from a country where the virus is endemic.

 

Dr. Mary T. Bassett, the city’s health commissioner, said there were several factors in this case that might have raised the risk of infection: The man was uncircumcised, the woman was in the early stages of her illness when her viral load was high, and she was also at the beginning of her menstrual cycle.

 

The woman, described as being in her 20s and not pregnant, had sex with her partner the day she returned to the city. The report does not name the country she visited, but the virus is now widespread in nearly 50 countries throughout South America and the Caribbean.

 

“She reported having headache and abdominal cramping while in the airport before returning to N.Y.C.,” the report said. The next day she developed a number of symptoms associated with Zika, including fever, fatigue, a rash, back pain, swelling of the extremities, and numbness and tingling in her hands and feet.

 

She reported that her period, which began that day, was also heavier than usual.

Her primary care physician sent blood and urine samples to the city and state health department laboratories for testing. The tests detected the virus but not antibodies to it, which suggested she was newly infected; it takes four or five days for the body to begin producing antibodies.

Seven days after intercourse, the woman’s partner developed a fever, followed by a rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. The report said the man had not had any other recent sexual partners or been bitten by a mosquito within a week before his illness.

Three days later, the man went to the same primary care physician who had diagnosed Zika in his partner. The physician sent samples of his urine to the same laboratories, and the virus was detected.

According to the report, the man “did not report noticing any blood on his uncircumcised penis that could have been associated with vaginal bleeding or any open lesions on his genitals immediately following intercourse.”
It is unclear if the virus was transmitted to the man by the woman’s menstrual blood or by vaginal fluids. If the virus was passed along through vaginal fluid, there is very little information on how long it might persist there or how great the risk of transmission during intercourse is.
The report cites a recent study of nonhuman primates where three nonpregnant females were found to have the virus present in vaginal fluid up to seven days after exposure.
“Further studies are needed to determine if the virus is also found in the vaginal fluid of humans and, if so, for how long,” the report said.
Zika has previously been known to be transmissible via semen, where it can persist for months. The current guidance from health officials is that men who may have been exposed either abstain from sex or use a condom for six months.
 

Women who are pregnant or trying to conceive are warned not to have unprotected sex with men who have been in areas where the virus is spreading during that time.

Even though it is just one case, the fact that the disease can be transmitted from women to men — widening the pool of those at risk — will have to be factored into the response from public health officials.

The Aedes aegypti mosquito remains the major means of infection. In the United States, that species is found mostly in the South and the Southwest, though its range can spread in the summer. That mosquito is not present in New York, but a similar species, the Asian tiger mosquito, could theoretically pose a threat of transmission, health officials have said.

In response, the city has stepped up its mosquito control and surveillance, and it will soon be starting a new public education campaign that will continue to highlight the risks posed by mosquitoes but with added emphasis on the risks of sexual transmission.
Source: NYtimes.com
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Henrik Stenson Beats Phil Mickelson in British Open Duel

TROON, Scotland — Phil Mickelson has a documented history of runner-up finishes in major championships, having often endured memorable heartbreak on the final day of tournaments. But during the fourth round of this year’s British Open, after a surprising surge during its first three days, Mickelson did not make a bogey and shot a six-under-par 65, the lowest score he has ever posted in the final round of a major.

 

It was not enough because his playing partner, Henrik Stenson, had a record-setting Sunday, becoming only the second golfer to win a major championship with a final round of 63 in beating Mickelson by three strokes. Stenson’s score of 20 under par for the tournament tied Jason Day’s record for the lowest winning score relative to par in a major. Stenson’s aggregate four-day score of 264 was also a record for a major championship.

 

With pluck, precision and a steely putting stroke under pressure, Stenson, 40, made 10 birdies on Sunday, to go along with two bogeys, in becoming the first Swede to win a men’s major championship.

 

J. B. Holmes finished a distant third at six under.

“I felt, and I believed, like it was my time to do this,” Stenson said afterward. “I just had to stay focused on the moment, and I did not waver doing that.”

Photo

 

Phil Mickelson reacted to missing his eagle putt on No. 16. Credit Russell Cheyne/Reuters

Stenson, the world’s sixth-ranked golfer, had been in something of a slump until recently, with one win on the PGA and European Tours combined since 2014.
It was a pattern that mirrored Stenson’s major championship record. At the British Open, he had finished tied for third twice and second once — behind Mickelson in 2013.

Sunday did not start auspiciously for Stenson, who badly missed an 8-foot par putt and bogeyed the first hole. When Mickelson birdied the hole, he eclipsed the one-shot advantage Stenson had held overnight and vaulted into the lead.

But Stenson showed what would be the strength of his game Sunday on the next green.

Stenson has always been known as a great ball striker, especially with his irons. If he has had a weakness, it has been putting, and specifically putting under pressure. But in Sunday’s final round, Stenson put on an exhibition on the greens.

He sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the second hole to tie Mickelson and drained a 15-foot putt for birdie on the third to take the lead as Mickelson missed his 4-foot birdie putt.

Mickelson’s eagled the fourth hole, but Stenson kept pace with his third birdie on the first four holes.

Mickelson said afterward, “I threw as much as I could at him, and he just kept making birdies.”

The two remained tied until the dicey par-3 eighth hole — known as the Postage Stamp — when Mickelson’s tee shot was considerably inside Stenson’s. But it was Stenson who made his birdie putt; Mickelson missed his.

Stenson held the one-shot advantage for only a few holes, missing a 5-foot par putt on the 11th hole. Mickelson made a spectacular par save after rescuing his ball from the fescue rough twice on the 12th hole, but Stenson surged ahead yet again on the 14th hole with his seventh birdie, converting a 20-foot putt.

The pivotal hole of the final round turned out to be the 15th. Stenson’s approach shot missed the green. But from the fringe, Stenson rolled in a 51-foot birdie putt that gave him a two-shot lead he never surrendered.

“I mean, Henrik made 10 birdies,” Mickelson said. “That’s impressive. I’m really happy for him, even if I’m disappointed with the outcome.”

Source:NYtimes.com

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No one to be fired after Melania Trump speech plagiarism episode

(CNN)Donald Trump's presidential campaign doesn't plan to fire anybody or to take disciplinary action over the controversy surrounding Melania Trump's plagiarism of Michelle Obama, CNN learned Tuesday.

Trump's campaign hopes to simply move on without further addressing questions about the speech.
Aides to the presumptive Republican nominee are scrambling to move past the imbroglio after a passage in Melania Trump's speech Monday night, which headlined the Republican National Convention's opening night, closely mirrored a portion of Michelle Obama's address to the Democratic National Convention in 2008.
It's set off infighting and finger-pointing within Trump's campaign, and two sources told CNN that Donald Trump himself is furious about it.
Trump's aides chalked the controversy up to media bias and blamed Hillary Clinton's campaign -- even though the apparent plagiarism was discovered by an independent journalist and had gone viral before Clinton's allies and Democrats even weighed in.
In an interview with CNN's Chris Cuomo on "New Day," campaign chairman Paul Manafort denied the allegations of plagiarism.
"To think that she would do something like that knowing how scrutinized her speech was going to be last night is just really absurd," Manafort said.
Manafort said the words Melania used were not "cribbed" but are common words.
"There's no cribbing of Michelle Obama's speech. These were common words and values. She cares about her family," Manafort said. "To think that she'd be cribbing Michelle Obama's words is crazy."
Sean Spicer, the Republican National Committee's chief strategist, invoked "My Little Pony" in defending the speech in an interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer.
"Melania Trump said, 'the strength of your dreams and willingness to work for them.' Twilight Sparkle from 'My Little Pony' said, 'This is your dream. Anything you can do in your dreams, you can do now,' " Spicer said.
He also compared passages of Trump's speech with phrases from musicians John Legend and Kid Rock.
"I mean if we want to take a bunch of phrases and run them through a Google and say, 'Hey, who else has said them,' I can do that in five minutes," Spicer said. "And that's what this is."
However, Trump's campaign faced criticism even from allies, who largely blamed staffers -- not Melania Trump.
Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski said Tuesday that whoever is responsible for writing the should be fired.
"Whoever was the staff person who wrote this speech should be held accountable and should be fired," Lewandowski told CNN's John Berman and Kate Bolduan.
Lewandowski, who is a CNN contributor, was fired from the Trump campaign last month.
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said at a Bloomberg Politics event Tuesday morning he'd "probably" fire whoever was responsible for including plagiarized quotes, though he added: "It all kinda depends on the circumstances and how these things are written."
The controversy quickly overshadowed the speech, which was to have been her introduction to voters. It focused on her immigration to the United States and her love for her husband.
The Trump campaign released a statement on the speech after the similarities were uncovered, but it did not mention the plagiarism charge.
"In writing her beautiful speech, Melania's team of writers took notes on her life's inspirations, and in some instances included fragments that reflected her own thinking. Melania's immigrant experience and love for America shone through in her speech, which made it such a success," according to Jason Miller, the senior communications adviser.
New Jersey governor and Donald Trump ally Chris Christie defended the speech, saying, "There's no way that Melania Trump was plagiarizing Michelle Obama's speech."
"I just don't see it," Christie told CNN's Jamie Gangel in an interview Tuesday, adding later, "If we're talking about 7% of a speech, that was really, universally considered to be a good performance by Melania. I know her. There's no way that Melania Trump was plagiarizing Michelle Obama's speech."

Who wrote the speech?

Side-by-side comparisons of the transcripts show the text in Trump's address following, nearly to the word, the would-be future first lady's own from the first night of the Democratic convention in Denver nearly eight years ago.
Sources familiar with the campaign's handling of Melania Trump's speech identify top Manafort deputy Rick Gates as the person inside the campaign who oversaw the entire speech process for Melania Trump.
Gates is denying he oversaw the process of putting together the speech.
When CNN's Jim Acosta asked Gates if he oversaw the Melania Trump speech process, he said "absolutely not."

Democrats' role

Manafort, on CNN's "New Day," said the scrutiny over Melania Trump's speech was the work of Clinton's campaign.
"This is once again an example of when a woman threatens Hillary Clinton, she seeks out to demean her and take her down. It's not going to work," he said.
However, Trump's aides haven't pointed to any evidence of Democrats' involvement in fanning the controversy.
The Clinton campaign's communications director Jennifer Palmieri said Manafort's comments about Clinton's involvement were untrue.
"Nice try, not true. @PaulManafort, blaming Hillary Clinton isn't the answer for ever Trump campaign problem," Palmieri tweeted.
Clinton's campaign on Tuesday focused instead on bashing Republicans for other speeches Monday night, including the mother of a Benghazi attack victim saying she'd like to see Clinton imprisoned and the crowd chanting at another point, "Lock her up!" In a fundraising email to supporters, Clinton's campaign said "there's a difference between drawing a contrast and baselessly saying your opponent belongs in jail."
White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters Tuesday that President Barack Obama did not watch Monday night's speeches.
"As it relates to Mrs. Trump's speech, I'll let all of you weigh in on all of that and try to learn more about how exactly it was written," Earnest said. "What I can say that in 2008, when Mrs. Obama spoke, she received an enthusiastic reception and strong reviews because of her words, her life story, and the values that she and her husband deeply believe in and try to instill in their kids."
Source:CNN.com
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Report: Megyn Kelly told Fox investigators Ailes sexually harassed her, too

Fox News broadcaster Megyn Kelly has told investigators hired by 21st Century Fox that her boss, Roger Ailes, has sexually harassed her in the past, and Ailes has now been asked to resign by Aug. 1 or face termination over the recently surfaced allegations about his workplace behavior, according to a report by New York magazine.

Twenty-first Century Fox, the media giant that owns Fox News Channel, declined to comment. Spokespeople for Fox News, the conservative-leaning cable news network founded by Ailes in 1996, couldn't immediately be reached for comment.

Ailes, who's Fox News' chairman and CEO, was sued on July 6 by former Fox broadcaster Gretchen Carlson, who claimed that her career was sabotaged by Ailes after she refused his sexual advances. He has vigorously denied the allegation, saying her lawsuit is a retaliatory measure for the network's refusal to renew her contract in June. She was let go, Ailes said, due to the low ratings of her show, The Real Story with Gretchen Carlson.

Twenty-first Century Fox, while expressing confidence in Ailes, has hired law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison to conduct an investigation into Carlson's claims. After reviewing the probe's initial findings, 21st Century Fox's top executives -- executive chairman Rupert Murdoch; his eldest son and co-executive chairman Lachlan Murdoch; and CEO James Murdoch, Murdoch's younger son -- have agreed to remove Ailes, according to the New York magazine report. It was written and reported by Gabriel Sherman, who's authored a critical biography of Ailes, The Loudest Voice in the Room.

Ailes now has a deadline of Aug. 1 to resign or face being fired for cause, the report said.

Several female Fox broadcasters, including Greta Van Susteren and Jeanine Pirro, have come out in support of Ailes in recent days. But the notable silence from Kelly, the network's rising star, on the matter has raised eyebrows among industry watchers.

In an interview with Charlie Rose in 2015, Kelly said Ailes was her mentor. "He's also a friend," she said. "I depend on him for friendship and sane, honest advice. He gives you advice on personal life, who you are and how you're translating on television. He has this x-ray vision into your soul."

Source:USA Today

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Kansas Black Lives Matter holds picnic with police instead of protest

A Black Lives Matter group in Wichita, Kan., originally planned a protest Sunday but instead had a cookout with police.

Following recent officer-involved shootings and acts of violence, the Kansas Black Lives Matter Group wanted to voice concern. Tuesday after a long discussion with the Wichita Police Department, the group decided to cancel the Sunday protest and instead come together with officers for the First Steps Cookout, a gathering in a local park aimed at taking the first step towards building a relationship between officers and the community.

Officers served hamburgers and hot dogs and played basketball with members of the community. Kids jumped in bounce-houses and blew bubbles. Officers and the community even danced together.

But, the tone wasn’t about food and fun. It was an opportunity to have difficult conversations aimed at change.

Jarvis Scott, a black man who sat at a table with a Hispanic man and a white man, next to Lt. Travis Rakestraw, told The The Wichita Eagle it was the first time since 1992 he’d sat down with a police officer. The other two said it was their first time sitting with an officer.

“It takes two parties to make a healthy relationship,” Chief Gordon Ramsay said.

During the Q&A part of the cookout, Ramsay took questions from the community about racial profiling, transparency and building relationships.

Community members weren’t shy to voice concerns. One of the first questions asked how a barbecue would help address concerns about racial profiling, and if the community was being bought off with food.

Ramsay answered questions on the spot and also offered to meet with community members later.

“I do want to challenge other police departments and communities to do the same things with first steps community cookout,” Ramsay said.

Source:USA Today

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People jump from Tappan Zee Bridge in New York after crane collapses

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — A crane collapsed onto the Tappan Zee Bridge on Tuesday, shutting down travel in both directions on the span that crosses the Hudson River in New York.

Police said people jumped from the span as a construction crane for the $4 billion new bridge crashed onto the old span around noon ET.

Workers are cutting up the crane to remove it from the bridge, which could reopen later Tuesday, said South Nyack-Grand View Police Chief Brent Newbury.

Rockland County Executive Ed Day said five people were injured — three drivers and two bridge workers.

Newbury said he expects "a traffic nightmare."

he span connects Rockland and Westchester counties. A new Tappan Zee Bridge is being constructed several yards north of the existing bridge and is expected to be completed in 2017.

In Rockland, cars were being diverted from Interstate 87 onto the Palisades Interstate Parkway. Trucks were being routed off the Thruway at Exit 12.

In Westchester, drivers on Interstate 287 were being diverted onto Interstate 87.

“One of the questions is how much if any structural damage did it cause to the bridge and how do they get the crane lifted,” said Rockland Sheriff's Chief William Barbera. “There might long term damage and might take hours to open the bridge.”

Rockland County, N.Y.-bound traffic backs up after

Rockland County, N.Y.-bound traffic backs up after a crane collapse on the Tappan Zee Bridge on Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (Photo: Michael Fibison, USA TODAY Network)

 

Drivers stuck in traffic on the New York State Thruway in Rockland County said they saw various emergency personnel, including an ambulance and fire truck. Drivers were seen leaning out their cars to take photos and videos of the traffic.

Diana Cortez, the Tarrytown, N.Y.-area director for the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, said her agency had sent two inspectors to the scene.

“It’s not going to wrap up today, that’s for sure. I have no idea" when it might, she said.

Greenburgh Supervisor Paul Feiner  said that there obviously has to be a review as to the oversight on the massive project. “Everybody who goes over the bridge expects that they are going to be able to travel safely. ... It’s unacceptable for any accident to occur on a construction project like this.”

Source:USA Today

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This job pays $263,500 for a few days' work

If you get an invitation to join a corporate board, you'd better accept it. The pay already was good and keeps getting better.

The median total direct compensation for outside directors hit $263,500 last year, an increase of 3% from the prior year, according to an analysis of pay packages from the 500 largest companies by revenue released Tuesday by Willis Towers Watson, a global professional services firm.

Not bad for a job that only requires an average of about eight meetings a year.

Much of that pay comes from stock awards, a median of $150,000 to be exact. But in a new development, directors scored a median of $108,000 last year just in total cash payments. That's the first time the cash payment to directors has exceeded $100,000, and this piece of pay alone was up 6%. That $108,000 cash payment includes a median of $100,000 for a retainer, $2,000 for board meeting fees and other cash for being part of various committees. A fifth of companies increased their annual cash retainers last year.

The increases in pay could be the result of more companies looking to get away from paying per-meeting fees to directors and paying "more for value of contributions," says Robert Mustich, Willis Towers Watson's managing director of executive compensation for the East Coast.

Many companies are making changes to their boards to boost retention of stock and to encourage directors to own stock. More than 90% of the companies studied require board members to own or retain company shares. To control "excessive" director compensation, more companies are putting annual limits on awards. Willis Towers Watson didn't release pay statistics on individual companies.

But investors don't have to look far to find some cases where board members were paid well above the median of large companies. All nine directors at Salesforce.com (CRM), a company that provides technology to companies, were paid a total of $580,000 or more in fiscal 2016. Sanford Robertson, founder of technology investment bank Robertson, Stephens, has been a Salesforce board member since October. 2003. Last year, he was paid a total of $634,493 for his role on the company's board.

Despite the large pay packages, companies are still having trouble finding candidates, Mustich says. "Given the growing demands and pressures being placed on directors, attracting and retaining qualified candidates to serve remains a challenge for many companies," he says.

Source:USA TODAY

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Body of children's author found buried in garden

(NEWSER) – British authorities say a children's author who disappeared in April was murdered by her partner.

The remains of Helen Bailey, known for her Electra Brown series of children's novels, were found buried in her garden on Friday, the Independent reports. According to the BBC, the 51-year-old Bailey was last seen walking her dachshund in her neighborhood on April 11. The dog's remains were also found on the property.

A post-mortem examination was scheduled for Monday. "Helen was immensely witty and talented," her family says in a statement. "We love her deeply and are immensely proud of her achievements. She is now at peace and we shall all miss her terribly.”

Bailey's partner, Ian Stewart, has been charged with her murder, as well as perverting the course of justice and preventing lawful burial. He was arrested last Monday, the Mirror reports.

Stewart, who police say reported Bailey missing, had said he was "shattered" at the time. Authorities were continuing to search their home — a 7-bedroom house worth $1.7 million — on Saturday.

Bailey's husband of 22 years drowned while on vacation in 2011, leading her to write a blog called Planet Grief in addition to her work on children's books.

Her bio there noted that "since 2013 [she] has lived in Royston, Hertfordshire, with her partner (AKA Gorgeous Grey Haired Widower)," a reference to Stewart.

Source:USA Today

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Netflix lands global 'Star Trek' TV rights before earnings

In advance of announcing its second-quarter financial performance, Netflix has landed a huge TV property to help propel its global enterprise: Star Trek.

The Net video service on Monday announced an international streaming deal with CBS to run the new Star Trek series, expected to launch in January 2017, and the entire Star Trek TV catalog including the classic 1966-1969 series in 188 countries, excluding the U.S. and Canada.

In the U.S., CBS will debut the first episode in the new Star Trek series with all subsequent episodes playing on CBS All Access, the network's own subscription streaming service ($5.99). In Canada, the first episode will premiere CTV with the remaining episodes on Bell Media’s cable networks, Space (in English) and Z (in French), and then later exclusively on CraveTV, Bell Media’s streaming video-on-demand service.

By the end of 2016, Netflix will make available globally the complete catalog of the original Star Trek series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise.

News of the deal comes as Netflix is set to report second quarter earnings after Monday's market closes. As usual, Wall Street is laser-focused on how many new subscribers the Net TV company has added in the U.S. and globally during the April-June period and its forecast for the current quarter.

Back in April, Netflix shares dropped 10% in aftermarket trading following the company's issuance of a lower-than expected subscriber forecast for the second quarter.

Since then, Netflix (NFLX) shares -- up 1.3% to $99.67 midday Monday -- have risen nearly 6%. However, shares are down 13% for the year.

Here's what to watch for in Netflix's earnings report:

EARNINGS FORECAST: Netflix had forecast earnings of 2 cents, compared to 6 cents the same period a year ago, with net income of $9 million, compared to $26 million in the same period a year ago. That is in line with expectations from analysts polled by S&P Global Market Intelligence, which also expect 2 cents on earnings of $9.7 million -- a bit higher than Netflix’s forecast of $9 million.

REVENUE FORECAST: Analysts expect Netflix total revenue of $2.2 billion, a 31% increase over the same period a year ago. The company’s total streaming revenue forecast targets a 33% increase to $1.96 billion.

SUBSCRIBER GROWTH: Netflix has tempered expectations with its lowest growth forecast in a year of 2.5 million new subscribers expected in the second quarter. That breaks down to 500,000 U.S. and 2 million new international subscribers. Wall Street analysts have differing opinions with many expecting higher numbers of U.S. subscribers than the company forecasted.

Guggenheim Securities Equity Research analyst Michael Morris thinks that Netflix offers domestic and international upsides. Here in the U.S., Netflix will continue to capture viewership from traditional broadcast and cable networks, he says, in part because the streaming service is a better value.

Netflix's global launch, Morris says, is coinciding with slowing economic growth internationally. "My hope is the company has set some reasonable expectations for the near-term trajectory," he said, "but over time they are going to be able to make very good decision in each of those countries and be a compelling proposition globally."

Source:USA Today

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Fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad can sway perceptions leading up to Rio Olympics

When sabre fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad steps under the lights on the fencing strip, her competitive instincts kick in.

She focuses only on her opponent and the weapon in her hand, momentarily forgetting the challenges she overcame as a Muslim athlete and the discrimination she faces based on her beliefs and skin color.

Ranked second in the USA and No. 8 in the world by the International Fencing Federation, the 31-year-old medal contender will carry that tunnel vision to Rio de Janeiro this summer as the first American to compete for Team USA at the Olympics while wearing a hijab.

“I’m very competitive, and this is the space where I felt most comfortable,” said Muhammad, an African American who embraced fencing because she could respect her religion by remaining fully covered in uniform without looking different from teammates or competitors. “I wasn’t going to allow other people’s misconceptions to change my journey.”

In April, Muhammad was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people. She was surprised to be recognized for having a global impact.

Though she welcomes the opportunity to be a role model for female athletes — particularly encouraging Muslim girls to participate in sports — the Maplewood, N.J., native said she struggles to remain outspoken against bigotry and hate. But feeling a responsibility to help her community fuels her fight.

Training in New York City, Muhammad — who started fencing at age 13 — mentors kids on Saturdays at the Peter Westbrook Foundation. She also advocates for tolerance on social media and recently has been documenting the challenges of preparing for the Olympics during Ramadan.

Because Ramadan is “such a spiritual moment,” Muhammad said she fasts from sunrise to sunset but works with a nutritionist to help her get enough water and nutrients early to sustain her throughout the day. However, she said she has always trained while observing the holy month.

After graduating in 2007 from Duke, the three-time NCAA All-American said she noticed the U.S. women’s sabre squad lacked diversity and became determined to change that.

She qualified for the national team in 2010 — making her the first Muslim woman to fence for the USA — and enters the Olympics as a five-time senior world team medalist.

“You really get a very deep look into someone’s personality when you see them compete in their sport,” Olympic-qualified épée fencer Jason Pryor said. “Once you see Ibti compete, you’re going to say, ‘Oh, this is who she is deep down in her core. Fight or flight, this woman’s going to fight.’ It’s just how she fences. Her aggression and her ability to come back and how hard she’s driving in to get that touch, it suits her.”

In January, Muhammad finished third in the Athens World Cup, which helped her secure enough points for a place on the Olympic team. The U.S. women’s sabre team also qualified for Rio, so she will compete individually and in the team event.

During the qualification period — April 2015 to April 2016 — she said she worried about having trouble traveling internationally, often hearing of Muslims being profiled and kicked off flights. Although it hasn’t been a problem for her, she said it’s still a concern.

Frustrated by negative portrayals of Muslims, she hopes her success will offer a different image. She wants to go beyond the burqa stereotype and popularize the idea of Muslim athletes by capitalizing on her Olympic platform with Team USA.

“She’s doing something special,” Rio-bound wrestler Adeline Gray said. “She’s breaking ground, and she’s inspiring that next generation of girls that never would have considered sports. That’s what (we) want to reach out to all young girls — not just Muslim women but also young girls that are in all religions and across social and economic levels.”

Source:USA Today

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Cruz booed

Cleveland (CNN)Ted Cruz sensationally withheld an endorsement of Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention Wednesday, earning a chorus of boos from the floor before he was upstaged in a power play by the GOP nominee himself.

In a dramatic development, as Cruz wrapped up his speech, Trump suddenly appeared in the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland. He walked to join his family in a VIP area and flashed a thumbs-up -- a gesture that transmitted clear anger at the Texas senator's behavior.
Cruz, his party's runner-up, uttered Trump's name just once -- to congratulate him -- and instead pitched the ideological brand of conservatism that endears him to the GOP's base.
"I congratulate Donald Trump on winning the nomination last night," Cruz said. "And like each of you, I want to see the principles that our party believes prevail in November."
But as it was clear Cruz was going to end his speech without endorsing Trump, delegates began to boo and some chanted "We want Trump!"
"Don't stay home in November," Cruz said toward the end of his otherwise very well-received speech. "Stand and speak and vote your conscience."
As delegates began to protest, Sen. Cruz's wife, Heidi Cruz, was heckled by Trump supporters shouting "Goldman Sachs!" and escorted out by security. Heidi Cruz, who is an employee of Goldman Sachs, declined to answer questions from reporters, saying, "I don't talk to the media, thanks."
The stunning political theater between the top two contenders in the Republican primary race blew open divisions in the party that the convention is designed to heal, and suggested Cruz believes Trump will lose in November.
Cruz's appearance at the Cleveland convention had been the subject of intense anticipation over his attitude toward Trump, after their intensely personal exchanges in the late stages of the primary race.
He got a prolonged standing ovation as he walked on stage for a speech that appeared to be an attempt to establish himself as the guardian of conservative values that some activists doubt Trump shares.

Blocked from Adelson suite

Cruz's rebuke ignited a hot scene around the senator as soon as he left the stage. People averted their eyes from Cruz and his wife as they walked with their security detail on the skybox level of boisterous Republicans.
On the donor suite level, people approached Cruz and insulted him, a source told CNN's Dana Bash. One state party chairman reacted so angrily that he had to be restrained.
Cruz, who has long sought the support of GOP megadonor Sheldon Adelson, was turned away when he tried to enter Adelson's suite.
Andy Abboud, a senior aide to the Las Vegas casino magnate, said Cruz was initially invited to come up to visit the Adelsons, but when he failed to endorse Trump the invitation was rescinded.
"When he didn't endorse, they were stunned and disappointed," Abboud told CNN.
"We could not allow Ted Cruz to use the Adelsons as a prop against Donald Trump," he added. "The Adelsons support Donald Trump and made that clear. They like Ted Cruz, but there was no way the Adelsons were going to be the first stop after not endorsing. That would be disrespectful to our nominee."
Trump did stop the suite, and Abboud tweeted out a picture of Trump with Sheldon and Dr. Miriam Adelson.
Trump, whose insults of Cruz were a constant on the campaign trail over the past year, tweeted that Cruz didn't honor the pledge GOP candidates had signed to back the eventual Republican nominee.
"Wow, Ted Cruz got booed off the stage, didn't honor the pledge! I saw his speech two hours early but let him speak anyway. No big deal!"
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie -- a former presidential candidate and now a Trump backer -- blasted Cruz's speech in an interview with Bash.
"I think it was awful," Christie said. "And quite frankly, I think it was something selfish. And he signed a pledge. And it's his job to keep his word."
Trump lawyer Michael Cohen said on CNN that "the only way to describe it is political suicide."
A source close to Cruz said the senator wasn't shocked by the mood after the speech.
"He expected people to not approve," the source said. "Not surprised at the reaction."
Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who accepted the nomination as Trump's vice presidential nominee at the end of Wednesday's session, sidestepped when asked about Cruz's speech.
"I am just grateful for all the support we are receiving and I am excited about the future," Pence said.
Eric Trump's reaction: "The audience didn't seem to like it right?"
Asked about the impact of the non-endorsement, Eric Trump responded, "I don't think it makes any difference in the world."
Hillary Clinton's campaign seized on Cruz's speech as well, tweeting: "Vote your conscience" with a link to her website.

Delegates unhappy as well: 'He failed the nation'

The reaction from the floor was also swift and harsh.
Newt Gingrich, appearing after Cruz, argued that Cruz's advocacy for constitutionalism meant that he, implicitly, endorsed Trump -- words he himself did not say.
"So to paraphrase Ted Cruz, if you want to protect the Constitution this fall, there's only one possible way and that's to vote the Trump-Pence ticket."
Richard Black, a delegate from Virginia who chaired Cruz's campaign, said after Cruz's speech that it was "doubtful" he would support him again.
"In the end, each individual has a duty to the nation that transcends the duty to themselves,' Black said. "That's where he failed... He failed the nation."
Rep. Trent Franks of Arizona, who backed Cruz, told CNN he was "disappointed" by Cruz' speech.
On him saying "vote your conscience", Franks said, "for the people in this room, a vote of conscience is a Trump vote."
Michigan GOP Rep. Bill Huizenga, a former Marco Rubio supporter, called Cruz' speech "a mistake."
Huizenga said it was also a mistake for the Trump campaign to give Cruz a coveted prime-time speaking slot without some type of "pre-condition" that he would formally endorse Trump.
Jonathan Barnett, a Republican national committeeman from Arkansas, walked off the floor after Cruz's speech.
"He's self-centered. It's all about Ted Cruz. All he did is ruin his political career," Barnett said. "I think he's finished."
Barnett said this is not the kind of grace one shows their party's nominee: "Reagan wouldn't have done that. He endorsed Ford."
Arizona delegate Bruce Ash expressed a similar sentiment.
"Cruz missed his moment. All he had to do was say 'Trump' and he used the dog whistle for 'conscience.' A very disappointing message," Ash texted.

Cruz's difficult challenge

The speech was difficult from the start: Cruz's goal was to walk a tightrope and keep alive his political viability for 2020 without alienating Trump's legion of supporters.
It was the latter that tripped him up.
Cruz came to the dais facing significant pressure to endorse Trump from his campaign aides and surrogates. Yet he is still at a moment of power and relevance: Only 45, a Latino senator who ended his campaign holding onto more political capital than he has ever enjoyed in his career.
His challenge was to remain well-liked in a GOP that, at least for now, is under the control of a man Cruz has indicated that he does not respect. Cruz effectively placed a risky bet that the Republican Party will judge Trump harshly and reward him in the new era for not caving.
"If skillfully played, his stock will rise," Randall Dunning, a Texas delegate who has misgivings about Trump, said the day before he spoke.
Wes Brumit, a Cruz delegate from Texas, defended Cruz's non-endorsement Wednesday night.
"He did mention all the points Trump mentioned: building a wall, fighting ISIS. He just didn't come right out and endorse," said Bumit, who sported a red "Ted Cruz for President" T-shirt and a cowboy hat. "He said everyone should be able to vote their conscience. And that's OK with me."
As for those who loudly booed Cruz? "All the boos were exactly the New York values that Ted has talked about."
Bumit added: "I think Mr. Trump has some things to apologize for to Cruz before Sen Cruz can come onboard fully for Trump."
But the question now is how skillful Cruz played it. If Trump loses narrowly, holdouts like Cruz could be held responsible in 2020 for not unifying the party. And it is clear there are Trump loyalists who now say they are loathe to back him.
Cruz and Trump, once political allies, turned on one another as they became the top two Republicans in the race. And their tension exploded when Trump's associates fanned flames of salacious tabloid rumors about Cruz and later attacked Cruz's father.
Since withdrawing from the race, Cruz has repeatedly declined to endorse Trump, but maintained that he could always come around to backing the Republican nominee. Yet their past tension -- and the personal attacks -- cast a cloud over any accord between the two aspirants.
Cruz's chief strategist Jason Johnson tweeted: "Since it's obvious the shock is contrived, let me ask: What the Hell did they expect from the son of the man who killed JFK? Light'n up."

Cruz booed

Story highlights

  • The Texas senator was booed after he didn't endorse Trump
  • "Stand and speak and vote your conscience," he said

Cleveland (CNN)Ted Cruz sensationally withheld an endorsement of Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention Wednesday, earning a chorus of boos from the floor before he was upstaged in a power play by the GOP nominee himself.

In a dramatic development, as Cruz wrapped up his speech, Trump suddenly appeared in the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland. He walked to join his family in a VIP area and flashed a thumbs-up -- a gesture that transmitted clear anger at the Texas senator's behavior.
Cruz, his party's runner-up, uttered Trump's name just once -- to congratulate him -- and instead pitched the ideological brand of conservatism that endears him to the GOP's base.
"I congratulate Donald Trump on winning the nomination last night," Cruz said. "And like each of you, I want to see the principles that our party believes prevail in November."
 
Laura Ingraham scolds Trump holdouts: Honor your pledge
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
Laura Ingraham scolds Trump holdouts: Honor your pledge 01:54
But as it was clear Cruz was going to end his speech without endorsing Trump, delegates began to boo and some chanted "We want Trump!"
"Don't stay home in November," Cruz said toward the end of his otherwise very well-received speech. "Stand and speak and vote your conscience."
As delegates began to protest, Sen. Cruz's wife, Heidi Cruz, was heckled by Trump supporters shouting "Goldman Sachs!" and escorted out by security. Heidi Cruz, who is an employee of Goldman Sachs, declined to answer questions from reporters, saying, "I don't talk to the media, thanks."
The stunning political theater between the top two contenders in the Republican primary race blew open divisions in the party that the convention is designed to heal, and suggested Cruz believes Trump will lose in November.
Cruz's appearance at the Cleveland convention had been the subject of intense anticipation over his attitude toward Trump, after their intensely personal exchanges in the late stages of the primary race.
He got a prolonged standing ovation as he walked on stage for a speech that appeared to be an attempt to establish himself as the guardian of conservative values that some activists doubt Trump shares.

Blocked from Adelson suite

Cruz's rebuke ignited a hot scene around the senator as soon as he left the stage. People averted their eyes from Cruz and his wife as they walked with their security detail on the skybox level of boisterous Republicans.
On the donor suite level, people approached Cruz and insulted him, a source told CNN's Dana Bash. One state party chairman reacted so angrily that he had to be restrained.
Cruz, who has long sought the support of GOP megadonor Sheldon Adelson, was turned away when he tried to enter Adelson's suite.
Andy Abboud, a senior aide to the Las Vegas casino magnate, said Cruz was initially invited to come up to visit the Adelsons, but when he failed to endorse Trump the invitation was rescinded.
"When he didn't endorse, they were stunned and disappointed," Abboud told CNN.
"We could not allow Ted Cruz to use the Adelsons as a prop against Donald Trump," he added. "The Adelsons support Donald Trump and made that clear. They like Ted Cruz, but there was no way the Adelsons were going to be the first stop after not endorsing. That would be disrespectful to our nominee."
Trump did stop the suite, and Abboud tweeted out a picture of Trump with Sheldon and Dr. Miriam Adelson.
Trump, whose insults of Cruz were a constant on the campaign trail over the past year, tweeted that Cruz didn't honor the pledge GOP candidates had signed to back the eventual Republican nominee.
"Wow, Ted Cruz got booed off the stage, didn't honor the pledge! I saw his speech two hours early but let him speak anyway. No big deal!"
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie -- a former presidential candidate and now a Trump backer -- blasted Cruz's speech in an interview with Bash.
"I think it was awful," Christie said. "And quite frankly, I think it was something selfish. And he signed a pledge. And it's his job to keep his word."
Trump lawyer Michael Cohen said on CNN that "the only way to describe it is political suicide."
A source close to Cruz said the senator wasn't shocked by the mood after the speech.
"He expected people to not approve," the source said. "Not surprised at the reaction."
Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who accepted the nomination as Trump's vice presidential nominee at the end of Wednesday's session, sidestepped when asked about Cruz's speech.
"I am just grateful for all the support we are receiving and I am excited about the future," Pence said.
Eric Trump's reaction: "The audience didn't seem to like it right?"
Asked about the impact of the non-endorsement, Eric Trump responded, "I don't think it makes any difference in the world."
Hillary Clinton's campaign seized on Cruz's speech as well, tweeting: "Vote your conscience" with a link to her website.

Delegates unhappy as well: 'He failed the nation'

The reaction from the floor was also swift and harsh.
Newt Gingrich, appearing after Cruz, argued that Cruz's advocacy for constitutionalism meant that he, implicitly, endorsed Trump -- words he himself did not say.
"So to paraphrase Ted Cruz, if you want to protect the Constitution this fall, there's only one possible way and that's to vote the Trump-Pence ticket."
Richard Black, a delegate from Virginia who chaired Cruz's campaign, said after Cruz's speech that it was "doubtful" he would support him again.
"In the end, each individual has a duty to the nation that transcends the duty to themselves,' Black said. "That's where he failed... He failed the nation."
Rep. Trent Franks of Arizona, who backed Cruz, told CNN he was "disappointed" by Cruz' speech.
On him saying "vote your conscience", Franks said, "for the people in this room, a vote of conscience is a Trump vote."
Michigan GOP Rep. Bill Huizenga, a former Marco Rubio supporter, called Cruz' speech "a mistake."
Huizenga said it was also a mistake for the Trump campaign to give Cruz a coveted prime-time speaking slot without some type of "pre-condition" that he would formally endorse Trump.
Jonathan Barnett, a Republican national committeeman from Arkansas, walked off the floor after Cruz's speech.
"He's self-centered. It's all about Ted Cruz. All he did is ruin his political career," Barnett said. "I think he's finished."
Barnett said this is not the kind of grace one shows their party's nominee: "Reagan wouldn't have done that. He endorsed Ford."
Arizona delegate Bruce Ash expressed a similar sentiment.
"Cruz missed his moment. All he had to do was say 'Trump' and he used the dog whistle for 'conscience.' A very disappointing message," Ash texted.

Cruz's difficult challenge

The speech was difficult from the start: Cruz's goal was to walk a tightrope and keep alive his political viability for 2020 without alienating Trump's legion of supporters.
 
Trump's plane interrupts Ted Cruz
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
Trump's plane interrupts Ted Cruz 00:55
It was the latter that tripped him up.
Cruz came to the dais facing significant pressure to endorse Trump from his campaign aides and surrogates. Yet he is still at a moment of power and relevance: Only 45, a Latino senator who ended his campaign holding onto more political capital than he has ever enjoyed in his career.
His challenge was to remain well-liked in a GOP that, at least for now, is under the control of a man Cruz has indicated that he does not respect. Cruz effectively placed a risky bet that the Republican Party will judge Trump harshly and reward him in the new era for not caving.
"If skillfully played, his stock will rise," Randall Dunning, a Texas delegate who has misgivings about Trump, said the day before he spoke.
Wes Brumit, a Cruz delegate from Texas, defended Cruz's non-endorsement Wednesday night.
"He did mention all the points Trump mentioned: building a wall, fighting ISIS. He just didn't come right out and endorse," said Bumit, who sported a red "Ted Cruz for President" T-shirt and a cowboy hat. "He said everyone should be able to vote their conscience. And that's OK with me."
As for those who loudly booed Cruz? "All the boos were exactly the New York values that Ted has talked about."
Bumit added: "I think Mr. Trump has some things to apologize for to Cruz before Sen Cruz can come onboard fully for Trump."
But the question now is how skillful Cruz played it. If Trump loses narrowly, holdouts like Cruz could be held responsible in 2020 for not unifying the party. And it is clear there are Trump loyalists who now say they are loathe to back him.
Cruz and Trump, once political allies, turned on one another as they became the top two Republicans in the race. And their tension exploded when Trump's associates fanned flames of salacious tabloid rumors about Cruz and later attacked Cruz's father.
Since withdrawing from the race, Cruz has repeatedly declined to endorse Trump, but maintained that he could always come around to backing the Republican nominee. Yet their past tension -- and the personal attacks -- cast a cloud over any accord between the two aspirants.
Cruz's chief strategist Jason Johnson tweeted: "Since it's obvious the shock is contrived, let me ask: What the Hell did they expect from the son of the man who killed JFK? Light'n up."
Former Cruz aide Brian Phillips also defended the senator: "Just more proof this is about submission. We were told for months Trump didn't need Cruz, but when he doesn't endorse they go apoplectic."
The remarkable moment at the convention was the second time Cruz was upstaged by Trump Wednesday.
At a rally on the Cleveland waterfront, as Cruz spoke gingerly to fellow Republicans about "our nominee" and the uncertain future under his former rival, Trump's plane flew in the clear skies behind him.
"That was pretty well orchestrated" Cruz said as the Trump-emblazoned aircraft buzzed through the air and the crowd booed.
Turning to his campaign manager, Jeff Roe, Cruz said, "Jeff, did you email them to fly the plane right when I said that?"
Source:CNN.com
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New HIV vaccine to be trialled in South Africa

Durban (CNN)A vaccine against HIV will be trialed in South Africa later this year after meeting the criteria needed to prove it could help fight the epidemic in Africa.

In 2015, 2.1 million new infections were reported -- two-thirds of which occurred in sub-Saharan Africa.
A small trial, known as HVTN100, took place in South Africa in 2015 to test the safety and strength of immunity the vaccine could provide, ahead of any larger-scale testing in affected populations.
Two-hundred and fifty-two healthy volunteers were enrolled to receive either the vaccine, known as ALVAC-HIV/gp120, or a placebo to compare the extent of immune response generated. The results were presented Tuesday at the 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa.
"This was precautionary to see if the vaccine looks promising," said Linda Gail Bekker, deputy director of the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre in Cape Town, South Africa, and president-elect of the International AIDS Society, who is leading the vaccine trials.
The vaccine stems from a landmark trial in Thailand in 2009 that was the first to show any protection against HIV, with 31% protection against the virus. This was enough to get experts in the field excited after years with no success.
"The obvious question is: Can we now replicate those results and can we improve upon them with greater breadth, depth and potency?" said Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease, whose organization sponsors the study.
The vaccine was improved for use in the higher-risk populations of sub-Saharan Africa, where a different subtype of the virus also exists.
"We've inserted specific inserts from viruses that have come off the subcontinent," said Gail Bekker. A new component was also introduced to stimulate stronger immunity, known as an adjuvant.
Four criteria were set as measures of its likely effectiveness, including the level of T-cell and antibody response to fight the virus if it were to infect.
"It gives the tick on all four, it does look promising and it should launch," Gail Bekker said. "We wanted to see a particular immune picture that would suggest that a big efficacy trial would be likely to yield results," she said.
"[This] was like the gatekeeper of will we or will we not go ahead," Fauci said, "and the answer is 'yes'."
A larger-scale trial of the vaccine will now begin in 5,400 people across four sites in South Africa in November 2016 and run for three years. A fifth dose of the vaccine will also be given in hope of longer-lasting protection.
The Thai study showed 60% protection against HIV after one year, but this fell to 31% by the end of the trial. The team hopes the new regimen will bring protection levels back up.
"We want to get it up to 60% and keep it there," Fauci said. "That's the reason for the boost and the reason for the adjuvant," he said.
Experts have long been awaiting a vaccine showing enough efficacy to dent the numbers of people newly infected with HIV each year, which fell by 0.7% between 2005 and 2015, according to a study published Tuesday and presented at the conference.
"We're hoping this can be the first licensable vaccine regimen in the world," said Gail Bekker. She acknowledged that this is unlikely to occur purely as a result of the upcoming trial, but hopes the results will provide the evidence needed by manufacturers and vaccine regulators to take it further.
"I don't think we are going to treat [our] way out of this epidemic, " added Gail Bekker. "We are ultimately going to need a vaccine to shut it down."
The first vaccines made available are unlikely to provide enough protection for use on their own, but will instead be needed in combination with the plethora of prevention, treatment and social interventions already in use.
"A vaccine is still hugely important for the epidemic," said Sharon Lewin, director of the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. "Even though we have all these prevention options, nothing will be as good as a vaccine."
Source:CNN.com
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The Best Foods On Your Journey To Flat Abs!

I’ve said this many times before girls, but unfortunately you will not achieve flat abs simply doing crunches alone. Just like you can’t choose where you gain fat, you also can’t choose where you lose fat, so it’s important to include exercises that help target your whole body.  

The other single most important thing when wanting to achieve flat abs is your diet. What you eat has a massive affect on your abs and how they look. These ten foods are the perfect flat ab snacks because they help to banish bloating with their fibre content and protein to help keep your metabolism regular. 

Apples
Apples are a great source of fibre and also help to keep you feeling full. Replace snacking on chips and crackers with one apple.



Dark Leafy Greens
Dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale and broccoli are a some of the healthiest foods you can eat. They contain fibre which will help to keep you full and regular, and are full of nutrients. Add your greens to salads, stir frys, sandwiches and smoothies.



Greek Yoghurt
Greek yogurt is a great source of probiotics, which help to keep the good bacteria in your tummy happy. This will also help to banish the bacteria that promote bloating. Make sure to buy the variety that still has ‘live cultures’ to reap all the benefits.


Almonds
Almonds are high in monounsaturated fat, as well as fibre, protein and magnesium which can help to stabilise your body’s blood sugar levels. They are the perfect snack, helping to keep you full and blood sugar spikes at bay.


Grapefruit
Grapefruit is packed with Vitamin C and it may work to lower cholesterol. Snacking on grapefruit can help you to feel fuller and satisfied for longer, due to it’s acidity which may slow down your digestion when eating it.



Quinoa
Quinoa is a great little grain that can help combat belly fat. Anytime you choose whole grains over white, processed flours you are helping to keep your belly flatter. Quinoa is an amazing source of fibre and protein, which helps to keep you full and can be eaten in so many different ways! I love mine in salads and alongside lean meats.



Salmon
Fatty fish such as salmon are a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids which are essential for your health. Salmon may promote fat burning by helping to boost your metabolism. Try grilling it to add to salads!
 

Berries
Berries are full of fibre and antioxidants which are optimal for keeping your abs flat. Add a handful to your diet daily as a healthy snack.



Green Tea
Green Tea is full of powerful antioxidants which can help to boost your metabolism. It is the perfect fat burning drink!


Legumes
Legumes such as lentils and beans are high in protein, B Vitamins, iron, potassium and other minerals. They are an awesome source of fibre which helps to keep you feeling full for longer and helps to stabilise your blood sugar levels.

Source:CNN.com

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WhatsApp blocked -- and unblocked -- in Brazil, again

WhatsApp has been blocked -- and quickly unblocked -- in Brazil by a judge for the third time in less than a year.

A court ordered mobile carriers in the country to block the Facebook-owned messaging app, which is used by 100 million people in Brazil -- and perhaps many more as the Olympics kick off in Rio next month.

 

The ban was suspended hours later by Brazil's Supreme Court, which called to "immediately restore" service.

The legal back and forth is just the latest in a heated standoff between WhatsApp and local authorities who believe it should provide user data to help criminal investigations. WhatsApp has previously said it can't provide the data that courts wants because user messages are encrypted.

Jan Koum, the CEO and cofounder of WhatsApp, called the latest court order "shocking."

"We're working to get WhatsApp back online in Brazil," Koum wrote in a post on his Facebook page. "It's shocking that less than two months after Brazilian people and lawmakers loudly rejected blocks of services like WhatsApp, history is repeating itself."

Related: Facebook and WhatsApp might be the next Apple in encryption fight

In May, a judge ordered a 72-hour ban on the service for failing to hand over data in a police investigation and arrested a Facebook VP. The ban was overturned by a judge less than a day later and the executive was released.

WhatsApp was also banned for 48 hours in December.

The court dispute highlights the growing tension between tech companies and local governments over data and encryption -- with no end in sight. Both WhatsApp and Facebook (FB, Tech30) have doubled down on providing end-to-end encryption for messaging.

As news of the ban spread on Tuesday, many WhatsApp users took to Twitter to complain about losing access to the app they rely on to communicate with friends and family.

"You have to be kidding me that WhatsApp is blocked again," one tweeted, according to a translation.

Source:CNN.com

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